Molasses Crinkles (or Crisp Ginger Cookies)

When I was growing up, one of my favorite cookies were Molasses Crinkles; deep, dark, moist, spicy cookies. The other day I noticed I had some molasses in the cupboard and although these cookies are better suited for the fall than the spring, I decided to whip up a batch.

The recipe I found in my grandmother’s recipe box calls them Crisp Ginger Cookies–same cookies, different name, yet with a handwritten note at the top calling them “Molasses Crinkles”; somewhere through the years the name changed.

These are super easy to make and inexpensive, too. There is a local bakery that sells similar cookies for $4 for six, but you can make a whole batch for much less. I grew up making these with Crisco, but this time made them with butter. Either way they are delicious. And the less you cook them, the more moist they will be.

Molasses Crinkles (or Crisp Ginger Cookies)
1  cup sugar
3/4 cup Crisco (or butter)
4 TBS molasses
1 egg
2 C. Flour
2 tsp. Soda (scant)
1 tsp. each salt, ginger, cloves, cinnamon (Note, I used 1/2 tsp. of salt)

1. Sift the dry ingredients together in a large bowl. Add the Crisco or butter, molasses, and egg and mix thoroughly.
2. Take a tablespoon and form into small balls. Dip the end into granulated sugar. Set sugar end up on greased tin. Bake at moderate oven (325 degrees for me) for about 10-12 minutes.

Enjoy right out of the oven with a glass of milk! 

PS. They’re also good the next morning with coffee!

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Molasses Crinkles (or Crisp Ginger Cookies)

  1. All of these recipes sound yummy! You’ll be happy to know that I’ve printed them all out and am adding them to my good recipes binder. I’m excited to try them all! Looks like I’ll be busy in the kitchen this weekend!

  2. One thing I learned after making these crispy cookies for years is that if you want a softer version, as some folks do with molasses cookies, all you have to do is put a piece of bread into the container of cookies and seal it. The moisture from the bread will soften them.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s