Summertime Holiday Dishes Plus MVK’s Food News of the Week

Note, apologies for the advance unedited piece you may have received on Monday; I’ve been having some troubles with my host and it sent instead of saved!  

I wish every morning this could be my view at breakfast.

I wish this could be my view at breakfast every morning! My view from the top of Mount Abraham.

“In the summertime when the weather is hot
You can stretch right up and touch the sky.”

“In the Summertime,” by Jerry Mungo

The first two lines of this old chestnut have been an earworm for the past two weeks or so. Long sunny days with the light going well past nine, and starting around 4:30 a.m., have me out and about well before my usual early rising time and sometimes well past my bedtime. No matter, this time is fleeting and I know in just a few short weeks I’ll start to notice the time change and that it’s no longer a bright light that wakens me.

That said, it’s almost Fourth of July weekend, which for some marks the start of summer. This is one of those golden years where the holiday is bumped with a weekend, so we don’t have the odd middle-of-the-week day off. I always find this time of year as one with family and friend gatherings, summer guests, picnics, and lots of opportunity to feed a crowd. So this week I’m recycling a favorite idea and bringing you some past suggestions for summer eating and hosting!

index

Miscellaneous and Appetizers

Jordan Marsh’s Blueberry Muffins
If you have some fresh blueberries, these are delicious and easy.

Meditteranean Kebobs
My go-to dish for potlucks.

Black Bean Hummus with Queso Fresco
I took this once to a dinner party and I ended up eating most of it! It’s SO good!

Kale Chips
Healthier than potato chips!

Soups and Main Dishes

Julia Child’s Vichyssoise
I’m not one for summer soups, but I do love this one.

Summer Minestrone Soup
A great soup with summertime vegetables.

Zucchini and Red Pepper Frittata
Eggs are a real lifesaver for dinner on summer evenings.

Marinated Grilled Chicken Legs
These are great hot off the grill or cold.

Marinated London Broil
Mmm…

Salads

Israeli Couscous “Tabbouleh”
A fun spin on an old favorite.

MVK’s Nicoise Salad
My take on this classic French summer meal.

Szechuan Cucumbers
No guilt if you eat the whole bowl!

Red White and Blue Salad
A fun salad for the holiday!

Asian Green Bean Salad 
A great vegetarian dish with an Asian twist.

Cavatappi Salad with Tuna and Olives
A delicious heart-healthy pasta salad.

Desserts

Strawberry Shortcake
It’s not summer without having this for dinner one night.

Old Fashioned Blueberry-Maple Pie
A Vermont spin on an old fashioned favorite.

pepsiMVK’s Food News of the Week: This is How Much Celebrities are Paid to Endorse Unhealthy Foods
I recently read this article about how much celebrities are paid to endorse certain foods, mainly soda and fast food. I was surprised and also saddened. If you can believe it (I can’t), Beyoncé was paid $50 million (yes, you read correctly) to promote Pepsi products! You can read the article by clicking here.

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Slow Cooker Chicken Tikka Masala Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

If you look carefully at the tippy top of the tree, you'll see all the red-winged blackbirds!

If you look carefully at the tippy top of the branches, you’ll see all the red-winged blackbirds!

It’s early March, there is mud not snow on the ground and the days are getting longer, so there is still enough light to catch a quick walk after work. The other evening, I had to stop my podcast to see if I was hearing correctly; the cheep of the red-winged blackbirds, a definitive sign of spring! Both blackbirds and robins are back in Vermont and I can’t remember a year they were back so early. I am cautiously optimistic that spring has finally sprung here, but that doesn’t mean I have put away my slow cooker just yet!

The one thing I wanted for myself under the Christmas tree last year was a slow cooker, or what we called a crockpot when I was growing up. While I had a smaller one, all the recipes I found called for the larger pot; I had visions of a winter of already-prepared dinners that I just had to warm and serve with some vegetables. I can definitely confirm its convenience; it is so nice to have a healthy meal I can pull out of the freezer in the morning and just heat after work. There’s nothing like it—aside from going out to eat! The only downfall I’ve found so far is the timing is off on a lot of recipes, so I tend to cut the time and watch it carefully. Maybe because it’s new it is also extra hot, and while I know you’re not supposed to open it to stir, I do to make sure nothing is getting scorched.

The Eater of the House and myself love Indian food, and Chicken Tikka Masala is a favorite, so I selected this recipe to make at home to see how it compared. Braised chicken with warm spices and a hint of coconut served over rice, it was a divine dinner. I was sorry I hadn’t thought ahead to make coconut rice, that would have been a perfect complement to the meal. (Brown rice cooked in a little bit of coconut milk, with shredded unsweetened coconut and minced ginger added.) The color wasn’t the vibrant red that you’d order in a restaurant, I’m honestly not sure what gives it that tinge, but it was still delicious.

Don’t be intimidated by the ingredient list, mostly it’s just measuring and adding. The recipe says it serves four, but I found it would served more even though it was just the two of us. The chicken was so tender it came off the bones, so I just stirred it in the sauce. I also didn’t add the extra Greek yogurt; I didn’t have any in the house and found it delicious just the same. And like my hope, I still have some in the freezer for a night I don’t want to cook!

tikka
Slow Cooker Chicken Tikka Masala

This recipe first appeared in the January/February 2016 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

Serves 4
(serving size: 1/2 cup rice, 1 chicken thigh, 1 1/4 cups sauce mixture, and 1 tablespoon yogurt)

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup chopped onion
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
6 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons tomato paste
2 (14.5-ounce) cans unsalted diced tomatoes
1/3 cup water
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon garam masala
1 1/2 teaspoons paprika
1 teaspoon curry powder
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon ground red pepper
4 (6-ounce) skinless, bone-in chicken thighs
Cooking spray
1 cup light coconut milk
3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
2 cups cooked brown basmati rice
1/4 cup plain Greek yogurt

1. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion, ginger, and garlic to pan; cook 6 to 7 minutes or until starting to brown, stirring occasionally. Stir in tomato paste and tomatoes; bring to a simmer, and cook 3 minutes. Combine 1/3 cup water and flour in a small bowl, stirring with a whisk until smooth. Add flour mixture, garam masala, paprika, curry powder, salt, and pepper to pan; stir well. Bring to a boil; cook 1 minute.

2. Place chicken thighs in a 6-quart slow cooker coated with cooking spray. Add tomato mixture to slow cooker. Cover and cook on LOW 7 hours or until chicken is very tender and sauce has thickened. Turn slow cooker to HIGH; uncover and add coconut milk, stirring with a whisk. Cook, uncovered, 15 minutes. Turn cooker off; stir in cilantro. Let stand 10 minutes. Serve over rice. Top each serving with 1 tablespoon yogurt.

evooMVK’s *Like* of the Week: High in the Italian Hills…
I consider myself more than lucky that my friend and journalist, Kieran Mulvaney, brought back a can of freshly milled olive oil for me from the hills of Italy a few weeks ago. I use olive oil daily, but have never had oil that was just pressed, so this was all in the name of cooking experimentation! It is peppery, strong, incredibly flavorful, and delicious. It tastes nothing like any olive oil I’ve ever had, even the most expensive kinds. And because it’s so fresh I know I have to eat it fairly quickly, I don’t want to! I want to savor the delicious flavor for months to come.

Kieran wrote about this special farm in Paciano where the olive oil came from in the Washington Post in 2014. You can read his article by clicking here.

 

 

Sweet Onion Risotto With Sautéed Kale Plus MVK’s Like of the Week!

Sunrise, Sunset.

Sunrise, Sunset.

Last week I brought you several comforting recipes to get you through January. Well, add one more to the list! Even though we’ve had more rain than snow this winter and it’s been in the 30s and 40s (a virtual heat wave by Vermont standards), it’s still that time of year you want something warm and healthy to eat at supper time!

With fewer calories and fat than macaroni and cheese or pasta, I think there’s something special about a warm, creamy bowl of risotto. To me it’s like a savory rice pudding for dinner! And this recipe includes the added benefits of some sautéed kale with nuts and raisins (which would be a delicious side dish anytime, or on its own), so you have a complete meal all in one bowl!

While the ingredient list may seem daunting, it’s the constant stirring that takes the time. I made this on a weekend, but you could certainly do this on a weeknight. And I’ll be honest, when I make risotto, I sometimes cheat. I’ll make sure the burner isn’t set too high, so when add the stock, stir, I will sometimes step away for a couple of minutes. And then rapidly stir when I get back to make up for my absence! Vegetarians can substitute either water or vegetable stock in place of the chicken stock.

The added bonus of this recipe is it actually makes three recipes! Set aside some of the risotto for Cauliflower Risotto Cakes and Italian Wedding Risotto Soup. (Recipes below.) I put my batch in the freezer to make these dishes later on!

Happy Cooking!

risotto
Sweet Onion Risotto with Sautéed Kale

This recipe first appeared in the December 2015 issue of Cooking Light magazine

3 cups water
2 1/4 cups uncooked short-grain brown rice
3 cups unsalted chicken stock (such as Swanson)
1/4 cup olive oil, divided
3 cups chopped sweet onion
3 tablespoons chopped garlic
1 cup dry white wine
5/8 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
5/8 teaspoon black pepper, divided
2 ounces shredded Gruyère cheese (about 1/2 cup)
3 1/2 cups chopped Lacinato kale
1/4 cup golden raisins
1/4 cup chopped pecans, toasted
1 teaspoon white vinegar

1. Combine 3 cups water and rice in a medium saucepan; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 15 minutes. Drain rice in a colander over a bowl, reserving 1 1/3 cups cooking liquid. Combine 1 1/3 cups cooking liquid and stock in a medium saucepan over medium heat; bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to low; keep warm.

2. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add 3 1/2 tablespoons oil; swirl to coat. Add onion and garlic to pan; sauté 8 minutes. Add rice to pan; cook 4 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add wine; cook 2 minutes or until liquid almost evaporates, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add 1/2 cup stock mixture to pan; cook 2 minutes or until liquid is nearly absorbed, stirring constantly. Add remaining stock mixture, 1/4 cup at a time, stirring almost constantly until each portion is absorbed before adding the next (about 30 minutes). Reserve 3 cups risotto for Cauliflower Risotto Cakes and Italian Wedding Risotto Soup. Stir 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon pepper, and cheese into remaining 3 1/2 cups risotto.

3. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add kale to pan; cook 3 minutes or until kale is slightly wilted. Stir in remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt, remaining 1/8 teaspoon pepper, raisins, toasted pecans, and vinegar; sauté for 1 minute. Top risotto with kale mixture.

Cauliflower Risotto Cakes

Italian Wedding Risotto Soup

bfMVK’s *Like* of the Week: Buzz Feed Food
I’ve always thought of the website www.buzzfeed.com as a fun pop culture website, not one where I would get “real” stories. That changed a couple of months ago when I signed up to get their weekly food newsletters. Their stories are fun and full of information! With an emphasis on healthy eating (“18 Healthyish Slow Cooker Stews to Get You Through the Rest of Your Winter”), fun graphics (“17 Charts to Help You Eat Healthy), and sometimes silly (“Grandparents Predict the Food Trends of 2016”), it’s a fun way to get more recipes, learn about health, and have a laugh along the way! You can check it out at Buzz Feed Food!

 

From the Archives: Comforting Winter Fare Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

Christmas Eve's sunset in Vermont's capital city.

Christmas Eve’s sunset in Vermont’s capital city.

Happy 2016! I hope your year has started on the right foot! Winter has begun in earnest here in Vermont; with a Christmas Eve high of nearly 70 degrees (yes, you read that correctly!), we now have a little bit of snow on the ground and it’s finally beginning to look like January. While disliking winter weather, I have to admit I have a special fondness for this time of year; the holidays are over, the light is slowly coming back, and when it’s snowing I don’t feel guilty about staying home for the day to cook and read. It’s time to roast root veggies in the oven, make a pot of farro to add to salads, and re-read Sense and Sensibility.

Since I am going into the fifth(!) year of My Vermont Kitchen, I decided to take a trip through the archives to find some warm and comforting recipes to start the year off a healthy foot. Such is the time for warm soups and stews, roasts, casseroles, and all of these recipes are some of my favorites that I make throughout the cold months; they’re healthy, delicious, and perfect to make when the weather outside is frightful. And most of these are either vegetarian and/or can be made vegetarian!

Turnip, Leek, and Wild Rice Soup
The underused turnip shines in this cream-based soup with leeks and wild rice.

Lentil Mushroom Soup with Barley
I find lentils and mushrooms cooked together with a little bit of barley to be very cozy. If you want to go the gluten-free route, omit the barley and pump up the lentils.

Hot Peppered Pinto Soup with Garlic
If you feel a cold coming on, make this soup STAT! Spicy with lots of garlic, it will keep those germs at bay!

Chicken Stew with Old South Buttermilk Biscuits
Warm chicken stew topped with homemade biscuits isn’t as hard to make as you think!

Braised White Beans with Garlic and Rosemary
A misread on a recipe turned into a happy mistake that I’ve made again and again!

Farro with Brussels Sprouts and Beans
With the addition of a little bit of bacon and shallots, this dish is easy to make with lots of flavor to warm you on a chilly night.

Sweet-Spicy Chicken and Vegetable Stir-Fry
With an early morning prep, this dinner can come together quickly after a long day.

Spicy and Creamy Pasta
Pasta, sausage, veggies, and a little bit of cream, you’ll think you died and went to heaven!

Roast Chicken
Roasted chicken is my go-to comfort dinner and one bird can make several dinners plus soup!

Barley, Corn, and Provolone Bake
A combination of easy to find ingredients makes for a delicious and nutritious casserole.

(Photo Faith Durand)

(Photo © Faith Durand)

MVK’s *Like* of the Week: 13 Things for Your Grocery List This Month
Along my reasons for liking this time of year (see above), I also love reading articles that highlight how to start the year off right. Here is a great list of things to add to your grocery cart this month. Grapefruits, Cuties, and coconut milk–yes!

You can read the entire list by clicking here.

One-Pan Broccoli-Bacon Mac ‘n’ Cheese Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

We've had warm and sunny weather this month. The crabapple tree is heavy with fruit!

I took this photo on a warm and sunny day. The crabapple tree in the backyard is heavy with fruit!

It’s the dark and gray month of November here in Vermont. So what is better than tucking in when you get home with a nice warm plate of macaroni and cheese? This one-pan dish is easy to make, plus it’s filled with broccoli and winter squash with less cheese, so you can feel good about eating this healthy twist on an all-time favorite!

I made this dish one lazy Saturday night; it had been a long day and I wanted something tasty and satisfying for dinner and yet I didn’t want to be in the kitchen cooking all night. I love one-pot meals, along with being simple to cook it makes cleanup easy! And this dish is easy enough you can fix it on a busy weeknight.

Don’t be put off from the color; the squash can give the dish an almost neon orange color. The broccoli gives a nice crunch with the creamy cheesy noodles and the bacon lends just a hint of a smoky flavor. Vegetarians (and other eaters) can easily omit the bacon and substitute vegetable broth or water for a completely veggie meal. I buy bacon a couple of times a year and when I do (unless I plan on frying up the entire package), I’ll wrap two-slice servings individually in cellophane and stick it in the freezer in a plastic bag so I have two slices ready to go for recipes like this. No need to defrost, just chop and fry. Served with a simple salad of greens, this was one dish you’ll definitely want to go back for seconds and put on your winter meal rotation!

macncheese
One-Pan Broccoli-Bacon Mac ‘n’ Cheese

This recipe first appeared in the September 2015 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

Serves 6 (serving size: about 1 1/3 cups)

2 center-cut bacon slices, chopped
3 garlic cloves, minced
2 cups unsalted chicken stock (such as Swanson)
1 cup 1% low-fat milk
1 (10-ounce) package frozen butternut squash puree, thawed
10 ounce uncooked large elbow macaroni
3 cups chopped broccoli florets
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
5 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, shredded and divided (about 1 1/4 cups)

1 Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add bacon; cook 4 minutes or until crisp, stirring occasionally. Remove bacon from pan.

2. Remove all but 2 teaspoons bacon drippings from pan. Add garlic to ­drippings in pan; sauté 30 seconds.

3. Add stock, milk, and squash to pan; bring to a boil, stirring occasionally.

4. Add pasta; cover, ­reduce heat, and ­simmer 5 minutes, ­stirring occasionally. Stir in broccoli; cover and cook 3 minutes or until pasta is done and sauce is thickened.

5. Stir in salt, pepper, and 4 ounces cheese. Sprinkle bacon and remaining cheese on top. Cover; let stand 1 minute.

rubbermaidMVK’s *Like* of the Week: Rubbermaid Easy Find Lids
This endorsement is sponsored by Cooking Light and Rubbermaid®.

One morning as I was making my lunch, I was lamenting the condition of my leftover dish drawer. I was in a hurry and trying to find containers plus a lid to go with each one so I could pack up my lunch. I try to keep things organized in the kitchen, but when I’m in a hurry, I can never find things easily and get frustrated with myself for not organizing things better and that I’m running late. That afternoon, I received an email asking if I wanted to test out Rubbermaid’s Easy Find Lids. I answered quickly with a resounding YES!

This 20-piece set includes different size nesting containers with the same cover fitting each one! Plus the covers snap together, so they are no longer roaming around all over the drawer! The different sizes are great for all sorts of things; they are handy for packing leftovers for lunch, prepping ingredients for dinner, and keeping my dried beans and grains in the cupboard. Best of all, when I’m getting ready for lunch, I’m not spending forever trying to find a lid, they are all right there. I’m thinking about buying another set!

Can’t-Believe-It’s-Veggie Chili Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

I couldn't resist stopping and taking photos of the foliage on my way home. The light was just perfect reflecting off the orange leaves!

I couldn’t resist stopping and taking photos of the foliage on my way home. The light on the orange and red leaves made the colors pop out!

Chili is one of those meals that is so easy to make that you can fix it on a weeknight without a recipe and it can be ready to eat in well under an hour. A little bit of beef with some small beans, onions, garlic, and spices, you can throw everything in a pot and it will always be delicious. But my veggie chilis in the past have been less than mediocre, lacking in flavor and texture. Besides some beans and vegetables, I’ve never been able to make a decent pot. But this is one veggie chili I can believe in! Seasoned with lots of spices, with beans and wheat berries as a “meat replacement,” this chili is one for the books and has convinced me that you can make a good veggie chili at home!

Although the ingredient list is long, you definitely can make this on a weeknight, just don’t do like I did and postpone cooking by 30 minutes because you forgot a critical ingredient and had to run out to the store! The veggies can be prepped in advance and the wheat berries can be cooked early, too. The only change was I substituted one tablespoon of tamari in place of the amino acids, since I didn’t have a bottle on hand.

I noticed the “(Meat) Eater of the House” had seconds so I take that as a resounding thumbs up! Topped with a little bit of cheddar, avocado, red onion, and sour cream, it made excellent leftovers for lunch, and enough to pop in the freezer for another meal!

chili

Can’t-Believe-It’s-Veggie Chili
This recipe first appeared in the October 2015 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

Serves 6 (serving size: about 1 1/4 cups chili, 2 1/2 tablespoons cheese, 4 teaspoons onion, and 2 1/2 teaspoons sour cream)

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cups chopped yellow onion
1 cup chopped green bell pepper
1/2 cup diced celery
1/2 cup diced peeled carrot
1 tablespoon minced jalapeno pepper
8 ounces cremini mushrooms, finely chopped
4 garlic cloves, minced
3 tablespoons unsalted tomato paste
1 1/2 tablespoons chili powder
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper
1 (14.5-ounce) can stewed tomatoes, undrained
2 cups water
1 cup lower-sodium vegetable juice
1/2 cup uncooked wheat berries
1 cup water
1 cup lager beer (such as Budweiser)
2 tablespoons liquid aminos (such as Bragg)
1 (14.5-ounce) can unsalted kidney beans, rinsed and drained
4 ounces sharp cheddar cheese, shredded (about 1 cup)
1/2 cup diced red onion
1/4 cup reduced-fat sour cream

1. Heat a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add onion and next 6 ingredients (through garlic); sauté 10 minutes or until liquid evaporates and vegetables begin to brown. Add tomato paste and next 5 ingredients (through red pepper); cook 3 minutes, stirring constantly. Using kitchen scissors, cut tomatoes in the can into bite-sized pieces. Add 2 cups water, vegetable juice, and tomatoes to pan; bring to a boil, scraping pan to loosen browned bits. Reduce heat; simmer 30 minutes.

2. Combine wheat berries and 1 cup water in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, and simmer 15 minutes or until liquid is absorbed. Add wheat berries, beer, aminos, and beans to chili; cook 20 minutes. Serve with cheese, red onion, and sour cream.

MVK’s *Like* of the Week: Candy Corn Cookies
I thought with Halloween just a few days away, I would bring to you one of the most popular recipes I ever posted on my blog for any new readers: candy corn cookies! These tiny sugar cookies are about an inch high in height and are adorable and make lots to share!

Aren't these adorable? And this was cookie sheet #1, so my batch definitely made more than 5 dozen cookies!Candy Corn Cookies
From PBS Food’s Fresh Taste blog, recipe by Jenna Weber

2 sticks of butter, softened
½ cups powdered sugar
1 Tablespoon vanilla
1 egg
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
3 cups flour
Red food coloring
Yellow food coloring

1. Cream together the sugar and butter until light and fluffy. Add the egg and vanilla and continue to beat until incorporated.

2. In another bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda and salt. Add dry ingredients to the butter sugar mixture and mix until a soft dough just forms. Remove dough from mixer bowl and separate into three equal pieces (use a food scale to weigh each piece if you want to be exact!). Mix together a little bit of red and yellow food coloring to make orange and then add the orange coloring to one of the dough pieces. Make another dough piece yellow and leave the third plain.

3. Place a piece of plastic wrap or tin foil inside a loaf pan and pat down the white dough inside. Place the orange dough on top (pat down firmly) followed by the yellow dough. Remove dough from pan, wrap up in either tin foil or plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight or for at least four hours.

4. When you are ready to bake your cookies, preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Cut 1/4th inch slices down the width of the dough. Continue cutting each slice into small triangles.

5. Place triangles on a lined baking sheet (line with parchment paper) and bake for 6-8 minutes until tops are puffy and bottoms are golden.

Yield: 5 dozen tiny cookies

Asian Green Bean Salad

Doing dishes is more fragrant with the Lily of the Valley and lilacs that are out! Next are the peonies!

Doing dishes is more fragrant with the Lily of the Valley and lilacs that are out. Next are the peonies!

I am always looking for new-to-me salads to make. When I recently was invited to a potluck garden party, my first thought was to make the first of the season macaroni salad. But given that I’m trying to be careful with the carbs these days, even if I was going to be offering it to others, I wanted to make something that had a little bit of carbs, lots of veggies, and lots of flavor.

This recipe, found on cookinglight.com was a perfect solution. Any time there are veggies in a salad, I never measure; my rationale is a salad is never hurt by adding too many vegetables! With some whole grain linguine and lots of green beans, red pepper, celery, ginger, plus a flavorful dressing, I made a choice that was a hit! I also dusted it with sesame seeds for a little more flavor and crunch.

One note, I have only chili pepper sesame oil in my cupboard at the moment, so I thought using it for the dressing would give the dish a little kick. Well, even I thought it had too much kick when I tested it! I actually thought about including a warning disclaimer with it! But it turned out, there were other chili heads at the party who liked it because I came home with an empty bowl! Use tamari sauce in place of soy sauce and either gluten-free noodles or all veggies for a gluten-free alternative. I thought this would be great with a piece of salmon or chicken. Would be tasty in the salad as well!

asian green bean saladAsian Green Bean Salad         

This recipe first appeared in the March 2008 issue of Cooking Light and is by reader, Linda Dalton of Stoughton, Massachusetts.

Makes 8 servings (serving size: 1 cup)

3 ounces uncooked linguine
1 pound green beans, trimmed
2 cups diagonally sliced celery
1 cup thinly sliced red bell pepper
1/2 cup (1/2-inch) slices green onions
1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Dressing
1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
1/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce
2 tablespoons dark sesame oil
2 teaspoons grated peeled fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 red jalapeño pepper, seeded and finely chopped (about 1 tablespoon)

To prepare salad, break linguine in half. Cook pasta according to package directions, omitting salt and fat; add beans during last 3 minutes of cooking. Drain and rinse with cold water; drain. Place mixture in a large bowl. Stir in celery, bell pepper, onions, and cilantro.

To prepare dressing, combine vinegar and remaining ingredients in a small bowl; stir with a whisk until blended. Add to salad; toss well. Cover and chill.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: France’s New “Food” Law

(Mario Proenca/Bloomberg News)

(Mario Proenca/Bloomberg News)

Just going to my own supermarket, and it is probably small compared to yours, I sometimes look at the abundance of food and am totally blown away that there is that much food in every supermarket in the country, even the world. It’s enough to make my head hurt because of the enormity and makes me ask, how do we do it? And what happens to the food that isn’t that great, but also isn’t saleable?

France recently passed a bill that makes it illegal for supermarkets to throw away food that is edible or passed its sell by date. Grocers either have to donate the food to charity or have it made into compost, energy, or animal feed. Think you can get away with it? The fines are steep, $82,000 if you don’t comply.

According to this op-ed piece in the Washington Post, nearly $160 billion in food doesn’t get eaten each year in the U.S. That is staggering. Interestingly, as I was researching this piece, I found that other European countries may be addressing this issue. I didn’t find one article that talked about the United States thinking about it. I compost, so I always figure I’m feeding my bunnies and other animals that frequent our meadow, but this does make me think twice about tossing out sad-looking veggies. Just more food for thought.