MVK’s Recipes for Autumn

sabattical
After much thought in the past few months about where my food writing is going and what I would like to do with it in the future, I’ve decided to take a pause from writing for a few months. At first I thought I only had an either/or, just two decisions, either keep writing or stop completely. But on a long walk last week I realized I can make my own rules and stop writing temporarily. Five years are a very long time to keep my creative juices flowing week after week and I’ve started to feel like I’ve been uncreative in both my cooking and writing. I know whenever I start to feel this way about anything, I know I need to take a step back and reassess.  

That said, I’ll miss writing about my favorite season and holiday, but I have collected some of my favorite autumn recipes to get you through the next few months, plus tips for Thanksgiving Day! And on Sunday, I will be toasting my favorite city in the world with a Perfect Manhattan.

May your autumn be happy, peaceful, and full of the bounty of this glorious season!

Love,
Chris

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Soups and Stews
Check out the farmer’s market and pick up some vegetables for my Late Summer Vegetable Soup.
Whenever I need some comfort, I make a pot of my Hungarian Mushroom Soup.
A delicious vegan meal, Autumn Red Curry Stew.

Main Dishes
This is one of my favorite chicken recipes, Chicken Stew with Old South Buttermilk Biscuits.
And another favorite chicken recipe, Braised Chicken with White Beans and Olives.
This recipe for macaroni and cheese is healthy and one pan!

Side Dishes
Although I love summer cooking, I admit I’m excited about root vegetables. Here are some of my favorite roasted roots recipes.
Fall means apples. Make some homemade applesauce!
I make this recipe for Roasted Delicata Squash all winter long!
Instead of the usual lettuce for salads, try my recipe for Autumn Kale Salad instead.

Sweets
My mom’s recipe for pumpkin bread.
Make these popular miniature Halloween cookies!
My go-to gingerbread recipe, courtesy of Lynne Rossetto Kasper of NPR’s “The Splendid Table.”

Since I’ve cooked Thanksgiving dinner for years, I’ve collected several tips each year to make the day a bit easier. And here are two recipes for the best rolls in the world that I’ve made for the holiday!
Astor House Rolls
Flaky Dinner Rolls

Ramps Two Ways Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

Speaking of a fleeting season, I wait all year for my lilac bushes to bloom! The peonys will be next!

Speaking of a fleeting season, I wait all year for my lilac bushes to bloom! The peonies will be next!

We are now looking at Memorial Day weekend in a couple of days and are in the thick of the springtime harvest season. The farmer’s market is now open outdoors, with the locals selling their delicate greens and late winter root vegetables. I think spring is the most fleeting of the seasons; I feel like I blink and I’m then looking at young squashes. Which means when it’s spring I take full advantage of what the season has to offer and for me that means ramps. The season lasts maybe three weeks, so when I see them I grab them, so I hope this post isn’t too late! If so, tuck this recipe away until next spring. You will thank me. 🙂

Ramps are also called wild leeks and can be found in wet, woody areas, but I, of course, find them nice and clean at the coop. They have a lighter, more delicate flavor than say garlic or even cultivated leeks. You can use both the greens and the stems for different recipes or all at once. I love to sauté the stems in a little bit of butter and then add them to scrambled eggs (the addition of some fresh dill and cheese only makes it even better). And you can add some to pesto and also pickle them, too. (See below.)

To clean ramps, I fill the sink with cold water and swish them to make sure all the dirt is removed. For the greens, I cut just where the greens stop and the stem starts.

One of my favorite food writers is Melissa Clark of the New York Times. She frequently appears on WNYC’s The Leonard Lopate Show, which I listen to as a podcast. Recently she was on talking about springtime vegetables: ramps, asparagus, rhubarb, and gave a “recipe” for ramps that sounded delicious. (You can listen to the show here.) I decided to try my own version. I grabbed a handful of ramps at the coop and created these two recipes, greens for one and the stems for another.

This recipe is forgiving. As I was making it, I didn’t keep track of the specifics, so you can make this for one, two, or more eaters depending on how many ramps you have! Hopefully ramp season hasn’t passed by and you to try this! It was sooo good!

ramps
Sautéed Ramps with Ricotta
Inspired by Melissa Clark.

These would be delicious as an appetizer or accompanying a nice dinner salad or soup. Or you could make it your whole dinner (that’s what I wanted to do!).

Olive oil
Ramp greens
Crushed red pepper (if desired)
A good baguette (gluten-free if needed)
Ricotta cheese
Fresh lemon
Kosher salt (or another larger-grained salt)

1. In a medium saucepan, heat about 2 teaspoons of olive oil. Add your ramp greens and sauté until just softened. If you want a little bit of heat, add just a shake of some crushed red pepper.

2. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Slice the baguette and put on a cookie sheet. Bake until the bread is nice and golden.

3. Add a smear of ricotta cheese on each piece of bread. Add some greens and just a tiny squirt of fresh lemon juice and salt. Then eat warm!

ramps2Pickled Ramps
The way I like to eat these is in a quesadilla or tostada. They are great with melted cheese!

½ cup apple cider vinegar
1 Tablespoon sugar
2 Tablespoons water

Mix the vinegar, sugar, and water together in a small bowl to make sure the sugar is dissolved. Add ramp stems (cut into half-inch pieces), and add to vinegar mixture. Cover. You can eat them in about two days and the bowl can be left on the kitchen counter covered for seven to ten days.

 

garlicMVK’s *Like* of the Week: Peel an Entire Head of Garlic in 10 Seconds!
Ok, I’ll admit I haven’t tried this technique from Saveur magazine yet, but since peeling garlic is my least favorite thing I do in the kitchen (even above doing dishes!), it is on my radar when I need a whole head of garlic!

Check it out here!

Super Bowl Snacks Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

In nearly five years of writing, I have never written an article on snacks for football Sunday! Which, when I think about it, isn’t that odd since I don’t really watch football, except when a game goes into overtime and I’m waiting for “60 Minutes” to come on, although I do usually watch the Super Bowl. But I’m only there for the snacks and the half-time show! And in my opinion, forget chicken wings and everything else, nothing is better than chips and dip.

These days, clam dip is non-existent on the fridge shelves at the supermarket and I’m not sure why. But when I came across this simple dip in the New York Times a few years back, I now make my own. Homemade is always best for most everything, because it’s healthier, you’re controlling the ingredient list, and there is no added fake ingredients! It takes five minutes to put together, an hour (or longer if you want to make it the day before) to sit in the fridge, and lots of veggies and chips on the side, you will be the star of the game! And if you don’t like football, the dip will also go well with Episode 6 of “Downton Abbey!”

I’ve made this with either two cans of chopped clams or three cans of minced. I don’t think you can go wrong with too many clams, and I up the Worcestershire to 1 teaspoon. I’m not shy with the cayenne and lemon juice, and like Sifton says, I taste and adjust the seasonings to my palate. I sprinkle a little bit of Hungarian paprika, for yet another kick of hot.

Not into clam dip? Here are some other suggestions healthy and delicious snack idea for game day!

Nachos: The direct opposite of loaded nachos you might find at a bar, my take is simple and delicious. Distribute a layer of tortilla chips on a cookie sheet. Add some grated sharp cheddar cheese and chopped jalapeno. Add another layer of chips, more cheese and peppers. Bake at 350 degrees until the cheese is bubbly, top with chopped scallions and serve with salsa and sour cream.

Black Bean Hummus: Healthy and oh so yummy!

Baked Artichoke Dip: For two years in a row, this has been the most popular recipe on myvermontkitchen.com! If you take this to a party, you will be the most popular cook in the room!

Guacamole: This recipe is for two, but just double (or triple) it if you have a crowd!

Deviled Eggs: In my house, these don’t last very long and are always a hit!

Mediterranean Kebabs: No cooking involved!

Homemade Salsa: Like I say, homemade is always best!

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Clam Dip
This recipe by Sam Sifton originally appeared in the January 27, 2014 issue of The New York Times.

1 pint sour cream

1 cup cooked and cooled chopped clams, from approximately 2 dozen littleneck clams, or 2 small cans of chopped clams, with three tablespoons of their liquor

1 ½ tablespoons fresh lemon juice, or to taste

½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce, or to taste

½ teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

½ teaspoon kosher salt, or to taste

¼ teaspoon ground white pepper, or to taste

Spears of red bell pepper, celery and endive, or salted potato chips, for serving

1. In a small bowl, combine the sour cream and clams and mix well.

2. Add the lemon juice, Worcestershire, cayenne pepper, salt and white pepper. Adjust seasonings to taste. Cover and refrigerate until chilled, at least an hour.

3. To serve, place a bowl of dip on a platter with spears of red bell pepper, celery and endive, or with salted potato chips.

theholiday

The kitchen from “The Holiday,” one of my favorite movies!

MVK’s *Like* of the Week: 13 of the Best Movie Set Kitchens of All Time
With movie award season upon us, I found this article highlighting the best kitchens in movies a lot of fun. I counted and I’ve seen ten of the 13 movies and am having a hard time selecting my favorite kitchen, but it’s a toss-up between “The Holiday” and “Julie and Julia.” But I love the kitchen in “You’ve Got Mail” too! Which is your favorite? You can see all the movies by clicking here.

 

 

The One Where the Cook Stays Home Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

This gorgeous sunflower field is on my commute!

This gorgeous sunflower field is on my commute!

Last weekend, four of my girlfriends were meeting up in Michigan for a book festival. It disappointed me that I wasn’t able to join them, so I tried to make the most of being home by celebrating the season in my own backyard!

Every month in Vermont has its jewels (well, maybe not January and February!), but September really stands out for me. The days are getting shorter, it’s dark when I get up in the morning and my evening walks sometimes end at dusk. And there is something about September’s light that is special; I can look at the reflection of the sunset on the mountain range that makes every little pine tree stand out, and then it is gone in the blink of an eye. The days and nights are getting cooler too, although you wouldn’t know it by Saturday’s record high of 85 degrees.

Photo7This time of year in Vermont you’ll run into harvest festivals, a celebration of the bountiful season with local farmers and vendors, and sometimes even suppers. This is one of my favorite times of year to cook because of the fall harvest, and while I’ve been cooking with the season, I didn’t have any special or new recipes to share (roasted beets, garlic mashed potatoes, and sautéed kale anyone?), but realized since I went to my coop’s harvest festival that I could share some of my favorite Vermont producers I buy on a regular basis for my far away readers! Many have stores, so check out their websites. If you are in Vermont, you can pop in for a visit and let me know if you liked them! And special thanks to The Eater of the House, who helped me out with the photographs, because I forgot my camera!

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Vermont Coffee Company
This is hands down the best coffee in the WORLD! Although I tend to be more of a tea girl these days (more on that later), if I do drink coffee, VCC’s dark roast is my choice. I’ve shared this coffee with many and a care package to a certain friend in Seattle isn’t complete without a bag of the dark roast. I sipped a sample of iced coffee sweetened with cream and maple syrup and I learned their method of making iced coffee that is a cold method rather than my method of making a pot then cooling it in the fridge. (They were out of pamphlets, otherwise I’d give you the secret!)

Photo2MapleBrook Farm
MapleBrook Farm’s specialty isn’t cheddar, it’s mozzarella. And now they are selling handmade burrata. Burrata was the “it” cheese a couple of years ago and I tasted it for the first time in New York City and since then I’ve been obsessed with it, but have avoided it since I know I’d eat the whole thing in one sitting. Burrata is a fresh mozzarella cheese, the outer shell is mozzarella, while the inside is both mozzarella and cream. MapleBrook’s samples served the cheese with a tiny basil leaf, a halved baby tomato, and a drop of balsamic vinegar and were an incredible taste treat. What I really wanted to do was eat the entire platter, but I was polite and stuck with just one. I now know what to make next time I’m searching for a special appetizer!

Photo3Red Hen Baking Company
I don’t buy bread that often, but when I do Red Hen is one of just two Vermont breads that I will buy. I almost always pick up a loaf of their seeded baguette on the weekend and serve it with olive oil and fresh garlic or just with some good cheese or local butter. (The above burrata would be incredible!) And their bread ingredients are what should make up a bread recipe: flour, yeast, water, and salt with no other additives.

Photo4Stone Leaf Teahouse
Like I said above, I drink mostly tea these days, usually flavored green tea or as a special treat, my favorite Yorkshire Gold. I always think of tea as an English beverage, so I have a lot to learn about Asian teas. And a visit to Stone Leaf Teahouse is a great place to do that. I had a sample of a dark Asian tea and some Chai, which was SO good!

Photo5Butterworks Farm
I have been eating Butterworks Farm’s yogurt for as long as I can remember, so I had a great discussion about their products, where they have been and where they are going. The oldest organic farm in the state, it produces yogurt and other dairy products and has now expanded and sells whole wheat flour, cornmeal, wheat berries, and dried black beans. And I learned something new! Apparently Jersey cows give higher protein milk, so their yogurt has a higher protein content than some others. I had no idea that different cows produced different levels of protein in their milk. And while I’m full-fat dairy all the way, they also produce low and non-fat yogurts, which allows them to skim off the fat for their cream.

Photo6Sunrise Orchards
My tiny town has its own orchard that I frequent in the fall, but it closes right before Thanksgiving, so winter fruit, besides citrus, is at a minimum for me. But I am able to get apples at the coop from Sunrise Orchards well into spring! Their Empire apples, a hardier variety, which I eat in the winter, are kept in a special climate controlled fridge that eliminates moisture, so the apples are kept fresh all winter long. I always wondered why their apples were fresher than if I kept them in my own fridge!

The weekend ended at a lovely local restaurant for a special evening of dinner, dancing, and watching the sun set behind the Adirondacks. Not bad to spend a weekend at home!

tourterelle

IMG_2841MVK’s *Like* of the Week: Ruth is Back in the Kitchen!
Last week, I lamented the fact that Mark Bittman is no longer writing for the New York Times. But this week I’m happy again, because my other favorite food writer, Ruth Reichl, has a new cookbook coming out!

The former editor of Gourmet magazine, the rug was pulled out from under Reichl in 2009 when the magazine shut its doors quickly and swiftly with no advance warning. So Reichl did what many of us cooks do, she retreated to the kitchen and cooked. My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes that Changed my Life, which is released on September 29, focuses on those recipes she made during that year of recovery, step by step, month by month.

If you’ve ever read any of Reichl’s writing, be it her memoirs, articles in Gourmet, or even her tweets, you know you are going to be in for a treat when you sit down with this book and I can’t wait. The New York Times had a great profile on her and the writing for the cookbook last week. You can read it by clicking here.

It’s Labor Day Weekend Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

This time of year, the front meadow is a sea of goldenrod.

This time of year, the front meadow is a sea of goldenrod.

I always use Labor Day weekend as the benchmark for the end of summer. Kids are back at school, the days are getting shorter and cooler, and the local apple orchard is now open. So this weekend is a perfect time to say goodbye to the season and to invite some friends over for some a delicious meal! I’ve scoured MVK’s archives for some recipes that would be perfect for this time of year. I hope whatever you do this coming weekend, it is filled with good food!

Appetizers

Deviled Eggs
Who doesn’t like deviled eggs? Take this to a party and they will be gone in the blink of an eye!

Baked Artichoke Dip
While this is a little fussy, it is well worth the effort.

Homemade Hummus
Know the ingredients in your hummus by making a batch of your own!

Mediterranean Kebabs
You don’t even need to know how to cook to make this tasty appetizer!

Entrees

Marinated Grilled Chicken Legs
Get the grill going for this flavorful chicken dish.

Linguine with Clam Sauce
If you can find fresh clams, this dish will be phenomenal, but canned work just as well.

Mystic Pizza
Impress your guests by grilling this pizza!

Marinated London Broil
Mmmmm…..

Brazilian Fish Stew
This stew tastes like a professional made it. Show off your skills!

Salads and Such

Potato Salad
I made this over Fourth of July weekend and am still thinking about it!

Kale Salad
Instead of a usual green salad try using kale instead!

Quick Pickles
Because I love these!

And you can never go wrong with a platter of sliced fresh tomatoes with basil and a little drizzle of olive oil and balsamic vinegar.

Desserts

Warm Roasted Peaches with Cream
Pick up some Amish peaches if you’re in the Northeast and roast them with a little cinnamon and nutmeg. You won’t be sorry!

Brownies
You’ll make a friend for life if you make a couple batches of these incredible brownies.

Crumbly Peach Pie
A summer isn’t complete without making my grandmother’s peach pie.

Cocktails

Mad Men Manhattan

Margaritas

Mocktails

sunday dinner

(Photo Steve Cavalier/Alamy/Alamy)

MVK’s *Like* of the Week: Should Sunday Roast Dinners Still be on the Menu?
One of the things I was most excited about when I was in London last year was going out for Sunday Roast, which is basically a full dinner at lunchtime. I have a version of that in my own home almost every Sunday because there is more time to cook; a really nice meal, usually a roast of some sort, to end the weekend and to have a nice start to the work week. Sunday just feels odd if I’m throwing together a stir fry.

So I really enjoyed this pro and con op-ed piece out of The Guardian last week for Sunday roast dinners.  Of course I’m in the “pro” camp; they truly are a comfort blanket meal. You can read the article in its entirety here.

Black Bean Hummus with Queso Fresco Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

I love my early morning summer walks. I run into geese, chickens, and Dexter the Cat!

I love my early morning summer walks. I run into geese, chickens, and Dexter the Cat!

A few weeks back The Eater of the House and myself were invited to a dinner party and the request was to bring either an appetizer or dessert. Since I had the time and the urge to cook a little bit, I made some chocolate chip cookies with coconut, but wasn’t really sure what to make for an appetizer. Be forewarned, if I am cooking for a group of people either at my home or for a potluck, I almost always try something new. Certainly not the wisest of decisions (the rational voice in my head is always questioning why?!), but I love trying something new to me and introducing it to guests. And I truly hit the jackpot with this dip.

This incredibly flavorful black bean dip has a little bit of heat, a hint of garlic and crunchy onion, and a combination of lime juice and red wine vinegar that is so good that after one bite I moved the plate closer to me with the hope the other guests wouldn’t notice. It was so delicious, I made it the next day just for myself!

I searched high and low in the grocery store and couldn’t find queso fresco cheese, so I used feta in place and it was just as good. This appetizer will make vegans and those who don’t eat dairy happy if you leave off the cheese as well as those who are looking for a healthy, flavorful dip that isn’t terribly heavy or rich. I thought it would be terrific as a vegetarian burrito filling or as an accompaniment for eggs!

black bean dip
Black Bean Hummus with Queso Fresco

This recipe first appeared in the April 2015 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

Can’t find queso fresco? Crumbled feta cheese can certainly be substituted, or if looking for a dairy-free version, just add extra onion and cilantro. I also added a couple tablespoons of water to make it more dip-like as I found it a little dry without it.

1 tablespoon tahini (roasted sesame seed paste)
1 tablespoon lime juice
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 (15-ounce) can unsalted black beans, rinsed and drained
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
3 tablespoons water
1 garlic clove
1/2 teaspoon red wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
2 tablespoons queso fresco
1 tablespoon chopped red onion
2 teaspoons chopped fresh cilantro

Combine tahini, lime juice, olive oil, beans, salt, water, and garlic clove in the bowl of a food processor. Add vinegar, cumin, and crushed red pepper to food processor with black bean mixture; process until smooth. Top with queso fresco, onion, and cilantro.

onionsMVK’s *Like* of the Week: Pickled Onions
This is more like my love of the week. Or month. Or year. I decided at the beginning of the summer to make some pickled onions to go with the burritos I was making. O. M. G. They are the best (and easiest) thing you can make to add flavor to your food! I take 3/4 cup of apple cider or red wine vinegar, 1/4 cup of water, and add some diced red onion. They last forever and are so good! I’m a big onion fan, so this just adds enhanced flavor with a little bit of a zing. I especially like putting them on a warmed corn tortilla with melted cheese, a scrambled egg, and some avocado for a really tasty breakfast!

I found this article, which gives great instruction on how to make quick pickled onions or you can do what I do. Either way, I hope you find a new delicious food accompaniment!

Homemade Salsa

apple orchard

The apple orchards are in full bloom!

I came to the conclusion recently that after writing this blog for four-plus years, I really need a recipe index for everything I’ve written and cooked. Because after searching, I discovered I’ve never passed along my favorite recipe for salsa! Guacamole, artichoke dip, hummus yes, but never salsa. After recently making a big batch, I figured I would right that wrong!

I know I’ve told you about the now defunct Horn of the Moon, a vegetarian restaurant in Montpelier, Vermont. As a teenager, I would take my babysitting money to enjoy pizza night on Tuesdays and sometimes would stop in for a sweet and hot carob (note, not hot chocolate!) after school. A definitive ’70s Vermont restaurant, there were spider plants hanging (in macramé plant holders) in the large windows that overlooked the Winooski River. Questionable décor, but the food was delicious. I even spent a day cooking in the kitchen in the hopes of landing a summer job. I can’t remember if they decided it wasn’t a good fit or if I did, but no matter, owner Ginny Callan has a beloved cookbook that I frequently turn to when l am looking to cook Vermont produce: rhubarb, fiddleheads, asparagus, and zucchini.

This recipe fits winter or summer; winter use a 28 ounce can of whole tomatoes, summertime six medium-sized. I like it really spicy, so I’m liberal with the cayenne and sometimes I’ll add a jalapeno with the green pepper. A lot of chopping and measuring, but in the end you’ll know it was worth the effort. And it makes 3 cups, so there will be lots!

salsaSalsa
This recipe is from the Horn of the Moon Cookbook, by Ginny Callan, Harper & Row, 1987.

One 28-ounce can whole tomatoes in tomato juice (In season, 6 finely diced medium-sized fresh garden tomatoes are a wonderful option!)
1 TBS. minced garlic
½ teaspoon salt
2 tsp. sunflower oil (MVK’s Note: I use canola or another light oil)
2 tsp, lemon juice
2 tsp. ground cumin
½ cup very finely chopped onion (1 onion)
¾ cup very finely chopped green pepper (1 large pepper)
4 scallions, thinly sliced
¼ to ½ tsp. cayenne pepper (to taste)
1 or 2 fresh hot chili peppers, minced (optional)

Crush tomatoes; chip or run lightly through food processor. Combine with rest of ingredients. Chill until ready to serve. Makes 3 cups.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Food, Wine, and Books!

nh22Last weekend I attended the second “Food, Wine, and Books” fundraiser for the New Haven Community Library. Held at Lincoln Peak Vineyard, we had drank wine and ate samples of recipes cooked from a variety of books in support of this local library. The evening brought together my three favorite things: books, wine, and food!

nh21It was picture-perfect, the temperature was just right and no bugs yet. We sat on the porch with friends we hadn’t seen in months (we are all coming out of our winter hibernation!), and chatted about books and politics while sipping the delicious wine and food. A cucumber dip from the book, Life from Scratch (a food memoir that is on my radar, but I haven’t read yet), was so good, there was a pasta/salmon salad out of Barbara Kingsolver’s Animal, Vegetable, Miracle, and I think my favorite was the chicken paté from my idol Ruth Reichl’s wonderful memoir, Tender at the Bone. (I’m always a sucker for paté.) It was a wonderful way to enjoy the springtime weather, support a good cause, and try out some new dishes!