Side By Side: Caramelized Cipollini Onions and Honey-Glazed Kohlrabi with Onions and Herbs

A little bit of Vermont foliage for you this morning. This was my drive home the other day!

A little bit of Vermont foliage for you this morning. This was my drive home the other day! Sometimes I am still in awe of the beauty.

One thing I don’t really pay that much attention to are sides when it comes to dinner. The main entrée is usually the star, and a simple salad or roasted veggies tend to be the quiet background. But lately I’ve been paying attention to the root and cruciferous vegetables that are still around this season. One of my latest favorites is tossing fresh broccoli with some olive oil and salt and pepper, lemon if I have it, and roasting until it is crunchy and crispy. Roasting brings out its sweetness and it is a totally new way to enjoy this tired staple. And I have two other new favorites!

ING-cipollini-onions_sql

Cipollini onions!

I went to book club recently and Mary P. brought along caramelized cipollini (chip-o-LEE-nee) onions that were simply delicious. So delicious, they made it to my grocery list immediately so I could make my own! This is simple, yet time-consuming, mainly because of the peeling and slicing of these small onions (in between tears and stinging eyes). This is my method: take a large pan, line it with olive oil, and when the oil was heated, add the onions (I had seven onions, it was about 2 cups if not more). Cook and stir at low heat for at least 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. I always add a dash of salt at the start of cooking to bring out the water in the onions to soften them. Continue to stir and keep a watchful eye so they don’t get too burned (the original 2 cups cooked down to about 1/2 cup when all was said and done). A couple dashes of balsamic vinegar at the end, and it made for a delicious accompaniment to chicken, but it would be delicious with pork, roasted vegetables, a salad topping, or even on toasted bread.

I discovered kohlrabi a couple of years ago, and normally I slice and chop and put it into salads. But this side is a whole new way to enjoy it! It was so delicious and really made me perk up and pay attention to other recipes for this vegetable. From the pop of the mustard seeds, to the warmth of the honey and smooth onions, this was a wonderful addition to Sunday chicken. Once the initial sautéing is complete, it’s just putting it in the oven for about an hour (mine actually took about 45 minutes or so) and then serve. I’m of Slavic heritage, so this was right up my food alley. Note, I completely missed the direction that the kohlrabi and onions were to be cut into wedges, I sliced everything. But I liked it that way and it didn’t affect the flavor at all. I had it for lunch the next day on its own and it was even better!

kohlrabiHoney-Glazed Kohlrabi with Onions and Herbs
This recipe originally appeared in the October 2014 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

2 teaspoons olive oil
5 small green or red kohlrabi bulbs, cut lengthwise into wedges (about 1 1/2 pounds)
1 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds
3/8 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup water
2 1/2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
2 teaspoons butter
1 medium sweet onion, vertically sliced into wedges
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 300°.

2. Heat a large ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil; swirl to coat. Add kohlrabi to pan; cook 2 minutes or until browned, stirring occasionally. Stir in mustard seeds, salt, and pepper; cook 1 minute. Add 1/2 cup water, honey, vinegar, butter, and onion; bring mixture to a boil.

3. Cover and bake at 300° for 1 hour or until kohlrabi is tender. Uncover and remove kohlrabi from pan; place on a serving platter. Return pan to medium-high heat. Bring to a boil; cook 6 minutes or until syrupy. Drizzle kohlrabi with syrup; sprinkle evenly with chopped parsley.

pumpkinMVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Make Your Own Pumpkin Pie Spice!

It seems like everywhere I’ve turned since the beginning of September, anything and everything talks about pumpkin spice. I don’t recall this being such a big movement in the past, but it seems to have exploded. Everything from lattes to doughnuts to coffee flavors, even book sellers are getting into the market!

The Kitchen recently posted a recipe on how to make your own pumpkin pie spice instead of buying it. Making your own spice mixture is wonderful, because you have it at the ready and lasts forever if it’s in a tight glass jar. I’ve done this with savory spices and it’s wonderful to have on hand. You can get the recipe for pumpkin spice here.

Honey-Glazed Pork Chops + Tomato Salad + Corn Cakes

When we have company, I pull out the stops. It won’t be the usual dinner of some chopped veggies with chicken sausages or a quick pasta, I like to make a full meal. So when the Eater of the House’s mother was visiting for a week, I planned nutritious, yet fairly easy full meals to make for work night dinners.

This recipe might sound like a lot, pork chops, salad, and corn cakes, but it honestly came together fairly easily—and Cooking Light was correct in that it took about 40 minutes from beginning to end! While the pork chops are cooking, you can make up the corn cakes and since they are small, they’re quick to cook.

I used boneless pork chops, because they were on sale, and cooked up five of them, so there would be some leftover (they were terrific warmed for lunch!). I didn’t have fresh thyme, so dried worked, just use and used about a half a teaspoon. The corn cakes might have been the best part of the meal; crispy on the outside, and creamy and crunchy with the fresh corn. The addition of the scallions was perfect. Mmmm…..I’m getting hungry!

Reminiscing about this delicious meal made me think I should pull out all the stops for week night dinners more often!

 

pork corn fritters
Honey-Glazed Pork Chops with Tomato Salad and Corn Cakes
This recipe originally appeared in the August 2014 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

Yield: Serves 4 (serving size: 1 pork chop, about 2 teaspoons sauce, and about 3/4 cup salad)

2 cups grape tomatoes, halved
1 tablespoon olive oil, divided
2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves
1 teaspoon minced garlic
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
4 (6-ounce) bone-in center-cut pork chops
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup unsalted chicken stock (such as Swanson)
3 cups baby spinach leaves
2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

1. Preheat oven to 425°.

2. Combine tomatoes, 1 teaspoon oil, thyme, and garlic on a foil-lined jelly-roll pan. Roast at 425° for 17 minutes.

3. Combine honey, cider vinegar, and mustard in a bowl, stirring with a whisk. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add remaining 2 teaspoons oil to pan; swirl to coat. Sprinkle pork evenly with salt and pepper. Add pork to pan; cook 3 minutes on each side or until desired degree of doneness. Remove pork from pan. Add stock to pan; cook 2 minutes or until reduced by half. Remove pan from heat; stir in honey mixture.

4. Place tomatoes, spinach, and balsamic vinegar in a bowl; toss to coat. Serve salad with pork and sauce.

Silver Dollar Corn Cakes

Yield: Serves 4 (serving size: 4 corn cakes)

1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 cup low-fat buttermilk
1 large egg
1 cup fresh corn kernels
2 tablespoons chopped green onions

Combine cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Combine buttermilk and egg in a bowl, stirring with a whisk. Stir in cornmeal mixture, corn kernels, and green onions. Heat a nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add 8 (1-tablespoon) mounds batter to pan; cook 2 minutes on each side. Remove corn cakes from pan. Repeat with remaining batter to yield 16 corn cakes total.

MVK Tip: To cut off kernels off of a corn cob, you need a sharp knife and a large bowl. Place the cob, flat side up, vertical in the bowl and cut down in a sawing motion, making sure you’re right at the bottom of the kernels.  Continue until all the kernels are removed. Once you do this a few times, it’s really easy!

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Thekitchn.com
If you are looking for a website that is a fantastic collection of tips, hints, and recipes, this is it! It was one of those “Suggested for You” websites on Facebook, and for once they got it right! If you “like” them on Facebook, you will find tons of tips in your news feed. “16 Smart Tips for Healthier Lunches,” “17 Easy Breakfast Recipes You Can Make with Eggs,” as well as stand alone recipes, and kitchen tips (how to organize your cupboards, how to test if baking soda and baking powder has expired). This is one of those websites that I find a little overwhelming, as there is SO much to read, you can lose an hour or two just discovering and learning new things!

Mission: Possible

Note the deep yellow hues in the field. Autumn is coming.

Note the deep yellow hues in the field. Autumn is coming.

No Meat

No Seafood

No Gluten

No Dairy

I’ve found myself being invited to a lot of potlucks this summer. In these days of food sensitivities, cooking for a crowd has become a bit more challenging than it used to be; no longer can I make a quick pasta salad with pieces of meat and cheese. I put a lot of thought into what I make so I’m sure everyone can have a helping; now, whether people eat it is another story, but at least I’ve attempted to offer a dish that can be eaten by all. The Eater of the House has noted through the years that while I make a healthy dish to share, that sometimes they aren’t that appealing. Hence the bean salads I’ve brought home because no one wanted them. (Insert sad face.)

The above was the list for the latest dinner party I attended. I fretted for days over what to make; every time I thought of something, it had one of the ingredients not to include. Cucumbers and tomatoes are in season right now, so I thought of an easy caprese salad, but I couldn’t use mozzarella. Then I thought of my cucumber salad, but I couldn’t use the sour cream. But what if I combined the cucumbers and tomatoes with other ingredients? With some leftover beans I defrosted in the freezer, I was well on my way!

This a terrific base-line salad, in that you can take the original recipe and add what you’d like to it: leftover chicken, salmon, or shrimp; feta cheese; even pasta all would be good additions to this, making it an entrée. Also herbs! I wanted to add some fresh basil, but didn’t have any, but I know that would add great flavor, or chives, mint, or dill. Try different veggies–crunchy red peppers, celery, kohlrabi would be delicious. The reason for the corn was I had one ear left in the vegetable bin, but I wish I had more. (And that ingredient is totally optional!) For the dressing, I used red wine vinegar, but another flavored vinegar or even lemon would be great. I measured it by the capful until I got the right acidity that I liked.

But best of all, the salad fit the bill and is relatively low in calories! And this time, I brought home an empty bowl! (Insert happy face!)

salad2
Cucumber and Tomato Salad with Chickpeas

Both tomatoes and cucumbers are water-filled vegetables, so I seed them as much as possible to avoid a soppy salad. To seed the tomatoes, I cut them into fourths and just remove a bit of the seeds before dicing.

1 can of chickpeas, or about 2 cups
2 large tomatoes, seeded and diced
3 cups cucumbers, peeled, seeded, and chopped into large chunks
The kernels from one ear of corn (optional)
4 radishes, sliced thinly
A couple of tablespoons of scallions
Olive oil and red wine vinegar, to taste (a few teaspoons each)
Salt and pepper

Add all of the ingredients into a large mixing bowl. Add the oil and vinegar and toss gently.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Nutritional Weight and Wellness, Minnesota

A few years ago I discovered the podcast, “Weight and Wellness,” produced by the nutritionists at Nutritional Weight and Wellness, http://www.weightandwellness.com/ which has locations surrounding the Twin Cities in Minnesota. Each week, they tackle a subject where nutrition can help you solve your physical ailments, from aching joints, menopause symptoms, anxiety and depression, and the list goes on. I always walk away with a list of tips and recipes.

Their website is a fountain of nutritional information and resources and they have four online classes you can take!  http://www.weightandwellness.com/services/online-classes/. I have yet to take one, but I plan to in the near future!

Spiced Chicken Thighs and Parsley Couscous

I’ve really gotten into spice rubs for meat lately. Easier and less messy than marinades, they are a nice way to spice up (no pun intended) a boring piece of meat, with spices and herbs that already are in the cupboard.

This was an easy Sunday dinner. Always one for looking for simplicity, by browning and roasting the chicken in the same pan, it makes a one-dish supper–less cleanup! I had Israeli couscous in the cupboard, so I used that, which made it more of a pasta side dish. If you’re looking for a gluten-free alternative, quinoa or rice can certainly be used. Served with the first corn of the season, it was a delicious meal and the leftover chicken was perfect on my salads for lunch!

herbed chix

Spiced Chicken Thighs and Parsley Couscous
This recipe originally appeared in the August 2014 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

Sip on a cool glass of ginger lemonade for just 32 cents per serving: Bring 4 cups water and 1/3 cup sliced fresh ginger to a boil in a medium saucepan; remove from heat. Steep 30 minutes. Strain; discard solids. Mix the liquid with the juice of 2 large lemons and 3 tablepoons honey. Serve over ice.

Serves 4 (serving size: 2 thighs and about 1/2 cup couscous)

2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 teaspoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon ground ginger
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1/2 teaspoon grated lemon rind
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
8 bone-in chicken thighs, trimmed and skinned (about 2 1/2 pounds)
1 1/2 tablespoons canola oil, divided
2/3 cup uncooked couscous
2 teaspoons minced garlic
3/4 cup unsalted chicken stock
1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

1. Preheat oven to 425°.

2. Combine cumin, sugar, chili powder, ginger, 1/2 teaspoon salt, red pepper, lemon rind, and black pepper in a small bowl; rub spice mixture over both sides of chicken. Heat a large ovenproof skillet or cast-iron pan over medium-high heat. Add 1 tablespoon oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add chicken to pan, placing it skin side down; cook 5 minutes on each side or until chicken is browned. (If necessary, work in batches to avoid overcrowding the pan.) Transfer pan to oven. Bake chicken at 425° for 14 minutes or until done. Remove chicken from pan; let stand 10 minutes before serving.

3. While chicken rests, heat a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Add remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add couscous and garlic to pan; cook 2 minutes or until toasted and fragrant, stirring frequently. Carefully stir in remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and chicken stock. Bring liquid to a boil. Remove from heat; cover and let stand 4 minutes (avoid opening the lid). Fluff couscous with a fork, and stir in parsley and lemon juice.

summer_box1MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Lovethesecretingredient.net
Far be it for me to think I’m the only food blog out there worth reading (there are zillions out there, so I know I’m only a teeny spec in the cyber world!). But I came across Mary Frances’s blog, Love the Secret Ingredient, a couple of years ago, and have thoroughly enjoyed reading her adventures in the kitchen since then. She cooks a little bit like me; I have this in the fridge, what can I make?

She’s had a project for the last few months that I really admire: seasonal food boxes, all to benefit Feed the Children. I ordered the summer box (pictured), and received a delicious spice rub, some yummy salsa, and other goodies. And the box was totally gluten-free. This sort of project is totally out of my realm, so I’m excited to find something foodie related–and impressed she took her blog and food interest to the next level!

I’ll be ordering the fall box soon! Check it Mary Frances’s blog at www.lovethesecretingredient.net.

Peanutty Soba Noodles

rainbowI’m sure I’ve mentioned this before, but I always have a hard time bringing myself to buy some prepared foods if I know I can make it at home less expensively. If it’s the end of the week and the cupboards are bare, I sometimes go to a local supermarket to pick up something for lunch. This isn’t your usual IGA, it’s a high-end supermarket with a wonderful deli that carries lots of specialty cheeses, meats, and salads. And high-end equals high prices.

In the deli case, you can find small containers of egg, ham, and turkey salads, some with prices that range more than $7 a pound. They also make other specialty noodle salads: Thai, sesame, and peanut, with equally high prices. You get the idea, ridiculously expensive, since you can make a batch of egg salad or peanut noodles for a crowd for half the cost of one lunch.

This is my version of peanut noodles, one that is relatively inexpensive and which doesn’t require refrigeration immediately if you take it to a picnic. (Please note, this should be refrigerated at some point!) I made it for a picnic dinner a few weeks ago, and the Eater of the House took one bite and declared it delicious. This can be served as a meatless entrée or side dish, or add some tofu or grilled chicken to it to bulk it up. I wanted more veggies than noodles, but feel free to add more (or less) of either or both if you like. Experiment with other vegetables, maybe the crunch of kohlrabi? Or substitute another bean for the edamame. If you are eating gluten-free, look for gluten-free soba noodles (they are out there) or substitute rice noodles.

noodle saladPeanutty Soba Noodles

Baby carrots are perfect for making match-stick pieces! You can get shelled edamame in the freezer section; just put in a bowl and defrost for a little while. They thaw fairly quickly. 

8 oz. soba noodles, cooked and drained
1 TBS canola oil
1 c. shelled edamame
2 c. cucumber, peeled, halved, and seeded, sliced into half-moons
1 c. carrots, sliced into match sticks
1 red pepper, thinly sliced
Chopped scallions, a couple tablespoons

Peanut Sauce
¼ c. peanut butter (preferably chunky)
2 TBS rice wine vinegar
2+ TBS hot water
1 tsp. sesame oil
1 tsp. soy sauce or tamari
Sriracha sauce, to taste (optional)

1. Cook the soba noodles according to the directions. Rinse, add to a large mixing bowl, and toss with the canola oil.

2. Add the edamame, cucumber, carrots, and red pepper and toss.

3. In a small bowl, add all the ingredients for the peanut sauce and whisk. You want this fairly thin, add more hot water until you get the consistency you like.

4. Add half of the sauce to the noodles and veggies. Toss together and top with the scallions.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: David Sedaris

sedarisOne of my favorite writers is David Sedaris. While he normally doesn’t write about food and dining, he was recently interviewed on the NPR show, “The Splendid Table,” by host Lynne Rossetto Kasper. The interview was great fun and I appreciated the conversation about dining, family dinners, what his dinner table is like now, and his obsession with his Fitbit. You can read the transcript or listen to the interview by going here.

Flank Steak With Tarragon Green Beans

I love all the different colors of radishes this time of year.

I love all the different colors of radishes this time of year.

For seven years, I lived my life as a vegetarian. That said, it wasn’t until I grew old enough to listen to my body after a life-threatening illness that I realized that I really need to eat meat. (So apologies in advance to my vegetarian and vegan readers.) While I still have a mostly vegetarian diet, there are a couple of nights a week that meat is the main dish. Like the other evening.

When I was creating my grocery list and week’s menu of what I was going to make, I handed the June 2014 issue of Cooking Light to the Eater of the House and said, “Here, pick out your dinner.” I noticed he stopped at a couple of pages of “me” recipes, a bean dish, a farro salad, roasted halibut, and then he found it. “This,” he said, pointing to the picture of flank steak. “That’s what I want.”

I normally don’t cook beef that much outside of the occasional meatloaf and pot roast, and since we don’t have a grill at the moment, it would have to be broiled in the oven. No matter, the recipe looked delicious and I crossed my fingers for a successful meal.

This meal was beyond successful! Sometimes things in the kitchen just seem to come together like magic. After a long day, I made an easy rub for the meat and popped it under the broiler, trimmed the green beans and tossed them into boiling water, and made a nice salad with the above radishes and avocado. This definitely could be a Week Night Dinner, as there is very little prep and cooking involved and what takes the longest is waiting for the steak to finish cooking.

A few notes, the original recipe also had tomato bruschetta served alongside, which I included if you want to make. For the beans, hopefully your market carries the small containers of herbs, so you can buy a little amount, since you need a teaspoon or so. Also, I omitted the celery seed, I really don’t like that flavor. I couldn’t find Creole seasoning, so I used Cajun, which added a little kick. I thought since both were Louisiana-bred, wouldn’t it be the same?

The Eater of the House can be given full credit for this amazing dinner. In fact, I think he was patting himself on the back when he went back for thirds! He has declared it the best steak he’s EVER eaten! What cook could complain after a compliment like that?

steak2
Flank Steak with Tomato Bruschetta
This recipe originally appeared in the June 2014 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

Yield: Serves 4 (serving size: 3 ounces steak and 1 bruschetta)

2 teaspoons canola oil
1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided
1/4 teaspoon Creole seasoning
1 (1-pound) flank steak, trimmed
Cooking spray
2 cups cherry tomatoes
4 teaspoons olive oil, divided
2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
1 small shallot, chopped
4 (1-ounce) slices whole-wheat French bread baguette
1 garlic clove, halved

Preparation
1. Preheat grill to medium-high heat.

2. Combine canola oil, paprika, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, and Creole seasoning in a small bowl. Rub spice mixture evenly over steak. Place steak on grill rack coated with cooking spray; grill 4 minutes on each side or until desired degree of doneness. Place steak on a cutting board; let stand 5 minutes. Cut across the grain into thin slices. Thread tomatoes evenly onto 4 skewers; grill 5 minutes, turning once after 3 minutes. Remove tomatoes from grill.

3. Remove tomatoes from skewers; coarsely chop. Place tomatoes, 2 teaspoons olive oil, remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, remaining 1/4 teaspoon pepper, basil, and shallot in a small bowl, stirring to combine.

4. Drizzle bread slices evenly with remaining 2 teaspoons olive oil. Grill 30 seconds on each side or until toasted. Rub cut sides of garlic over one side of bread slices; top evenly with tomato mixture.

Tarragon Green Beans
1 pound trimmed green beans
2 quarts boiling water
1 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon finely chopped tarragon
1 teaspoon white balsamic vinegar
1/4 teaspoon celery seeds
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Preparation
Add green beans to boiling water; cook 4 minutes. Drain. Stir in butter, tarragon, vinegar, celery seeds, kosher salt, and pepper.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week

world cupIt’s World Cup time, when country after country compete for the top prize in soccer. I am the farthest thing from a sports junkie; I pay attention to whether the Yankees are beating the Red Sox, I watch college basketball in the winter when I’m knitting, and I watch the Super Bowl for the half-time show and that’s about it. I even had to ask my friends how often the World Cup comes around? (One year? Two years? The answer is every four.) So when it comes to sports, I’m all about the food. I love being invite to or hosting a Super Bowl or Final Four party because that means lots of delicious snacks and food! And look what I found to celebrate the World Cup, a bracket of food per country!

Will Switzerland’s fondue beat out Ecuador’s Chulpichochos? Will England’s Yorkshire Pudding smoke out Italy’s Pasta Pomodoro? You’ll have to check in to find out!

The World Cup of Food

Mediterranean Kebabs

lilacs

The lilacs are finally in bloom! I could bury my nose in their wonderful scent all day long!

This week’s dish can’t even be defined as a recipe, it’s more like a set of instructions!

A few weeks ago I was going to book club and instead of a green salad, I wanted to do something that was a little bit out of the box, was delicious, and the most important thing, I had about 15 minutes to put it together! So I created these vegetable kebabs, which can be used as an appetizer or in place of salad for dinner. Veggies, a little bit of cheese, and the flavor of fresh basil, they even make for a wonderful for lunch! Once you have everything chopped and ready to go, it really is done in 15 minutes!

I made mine with chunks of European cucumber, a baby mozzarella ball, a piece of fresh basil, and grape tomato sliced in half. I topped with some salt and pepper and a little drizzle of extra virgin olive oil. I thought a sprinkle of balsamic vinegar could be a good addition, too. I kept the order the same and made two rounds on the skewer. The skewers I have are six-inches long, just the right size, since these aren’t going on the grill.

You can make these with pieces of meat (think salami, spicy ham), different veggies (red, yellow, and orange peppers would be great!), with or without cheese, even fruit. Think about what flavors will go with what vegetables. Basil is the perfect herb since it is flat. I can’t think of another herb that would work quite as well, can you?

I have a potluck dinner to attend later on this week and will be toting these along. I think the kebabs are going to be made a lot in the coming months—a no-cook meal, they are perfect for those evenings when it’s too hot to turn on the stove!

 

Photo-skewers

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week
As I sat down wondering what I would endorse this week, my mind wandered to my adventures this past weekend. It’s garage sale season, and you will never know what kind of cookbooks you will find!

photo-coookbookI found this cookbook by local food writer, Andrea Chesman. I have a couple of her books and the recipes are always great. The book was in perfect condition and I paid $1 for it! (The price was .50, but since it was for the historical society, I said they could keep the change, big spender that I am!) So now that it is warmer weather, get out and check out some book sales! You may never know what gems you will find!

 

Roasted Asparagus: Two Ways

easterEaster always signifies to me the end of winter and the first real springtime meal of the year. With Easter so late this year, I’m already in full swing with the spring vegetables and recipes: radishes, baby beets, and asparagus. When I see California asparagus in March, I know spring has arrived. (To get local asparagus, I’ll have to wait until at least May!) With the traditional Easter dinner always a bit on the heavy side: ham, potato salad and/or sweet potatoes, I like to counter it with some roasted asparagus to signify the new season and to lighten up the meal!

These are two ways I roast asparagus that are easy and delicious. Hardly any fat and calories and true confession, I’ve been known to make a sheet of this for a solo dinner. Balsamic vinegar is always a wonderful addition to any dish, since a little goes a long way.

I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday and the Easter Bunny is good to you! I am taking a week or two off to celebrate my birthday as well as take part in an exciting event (check out this week’s endorsement following the recipes)!

asparagus2

Roasted Asparagus with Balsamic-Shallot Butter
This recipe originally appeared in the November 2002 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

Make the butter ahead of time, if you like. Roast the asparagus and toss it with the butter just before serving.

Yield: 8 servings

3 tablespoons finely chopped shallots
2 tablespoons butter, melted
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon grated lemon rind
2 pounds asparagus spears
Cooking spray

Combine shallots, butter, vinegar, thyme, salt, and rind, stirring well with a whisk.

Preheat oven to 450°.

Snap off tough ends of asparagus. Arrange asparagus in a single layer on a jelly roll pan coated with cooking spray. Cover with foil; bake at 450° for 5 minutes. Uncover and bake an additional 10 minutes or until asparagus is crisp-tender. Pour butter mixture over asparagus, toss gently to coat. Serve immediately.

Roasted Asparagus with Balsamic Browned Butter
This recipe originally appeared in the October 2013 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

Toss roasted asparagus in browned butter, seasoned with soy sauce and a splash of balsamic vinegar, for a super easy side dish that’s big on flavor.

Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 5 spears)
Hands-on: 7 Minutes
Total: 25 Minutes

40 thick asparagus spears, trimmed (about 2 pounds)
Cooking spray
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
2 tablespoons butter
2 teaspoons lower-sodium soy sauce
1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar

1. Preheat oven to 400°.

2. Arrange asparagus in a single layer on baking sheet; coat with cooking spray. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Bake at 400° for 12 minutes or until tender.

3. Melt the butter in a small skillet over medium heat; cook for 3 minutes or until lightly browned, shaking pan occasionally. Remove from heat; stir in soy sauce and vinegar. Drizzle over asparagus, tossing well to coat. Serve immediately.

Note: Finish the asparagus just before serving dinner. Cooking the butter until it browns slightly gives the dish a nutty flavor; watch carefully, though, since it can burn easily.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week
three squaresThis week, I am endorsing myself! I have the wonderful opportunity to moderate a food discussion with author and food historian, Abigail Carroll, at this year’s Newburyport (MA) Literary Festival on April 26. The session is titled “The Invention of the American Meal” and we will discuss Abigail’s book, Three Squares, and the history of our American eating habits. I found her book a fascinating glance at history regarding the three square meals we eat every day.

Here is a link to the festival’s website, http://www.newburyportliteraryfestival.org. If you are in the area, I’d love to meet you in person! Hopefully I will return with a recap of the event, if all goes well!

Happy New Year! May Your 2014 Be Bright!

“Hope
Smiles from the threshold of the year to come
Whispering, ‘it will be happier…'”
Alfred Tennyson

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After the ice storm.

I’ve never been one to be superstitious, but I am beginning to believe in the unlucky Number 13. While this year has had the highest of highs (trips to Florida, Newburyport, Maine, and New York City; a springtime visit from my friend, Kats, from Switzerland; hiking all over the state; and MVK’s collaboration with Cooking Light magazine), it also has had some incredible personal lows. A special thank you to my friend, Catherine, and the Eater of the House who have allowed me to keep on writing in the interim.

So cheers and Happy New Year! I, for one, am excited to turn the calendar to a new year. And on Wednesday, I am going to make a double batch of my black-eyed peas and collard greens that I posted last January for good luck, just in case!

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Good Luck Peas
Just omit the ham for a vegetarian version and it will taste just as good! Spinach or Swiss chard can be substituted for the collard greens.

2 teaspoons olive oil
3-4 cloves of garlic, minced
½ medium onion, finely diced
3 cups of collard greens, chopped
1 14 oz. can black-eyed peas
1 ¼ cup chopped ham (optional and gluten-free)
Salt and pepper to taste

1. Warm the olive oil in a large skillet. Add the garlic and onion and sauté until soft.

2. Add the collard greens and sauté until they are wilted.

3. Add the peas and ham, if using. Stir and turn heat to low. Add salt and pepper and serve!

Recipe Redux: Chris’s Chi Chi Beans

This past weekend, I got out of the kitchen and and into the car for a quick trip to Maine. After I announced last week that November was going to be a clean eating month, that was thrown out the window on the Piscataqua Bridge linking New Hampshire to Maine, and it became a bit of an overindulgent weekend of food and drink. I, thankfully, walked most of it off, but came home to a renewed promise to eat better this month!

Since I did no real cooking this past week, I thought I’d bring you an oldie but a goodie recipe I posted a couple of years ago. This is my go-to recipe when I am feeling poor in the pocket and in spirit. Vegan and gluten-free, it is healthy, quick to make, and easy on your wallet!

You can view the original post here.

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Chris’s Chi-Chi Beans
I usually serve this on its own, but if you want a little something extra, it is great served over whole wheat couscous to soak up the juice. And for a little bit more protein, serve it with either tofu or chicken.

• 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
• 2 cloves of garlic (or more if you prefer), minced
• 1 medium onion, diced
• 2 carrots, peeled and sliced
• One 14.5 oz. can (or roughly 2 cups) chi-chi (garbanzo, chickpeas), rinsed
• One 14.5 oz. can stewed tomatoes

Heat the oil in a saucepan and add the garlic and onion and cook until translucent. Add the carrots and cook for a couple of minutes until soft. Add the can of beans and stewed tomatoes. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a low simmer and cook until the carrots are soft, about 10-12 minutes. If you find the liquid is evaporating, you can add a little bit of water or white wine.

Cook’s Notes:
When I went to pick out a can of stewed tomatoes, I didn’t realize there are many different varieties these days! I like the “original” flavor, one that has onion, celery, and bell peppers.