Recipe Redux: Naked Apple Pie

Autumn is definitely here.

Autumn is definitely here.

 

I’m finding my cooking rather erratic in the last few weeks. The Eater of the House has been away and not home for dinner, so I’ve been fixing solo dinners, which usually consists of a mish-mash of vegetables and whatever else I can find to eat. But he’s home on the weekends, so that means big dinners that make enough leftovers for lunch. And revisiting old family favorites!

With the orchards now open, I can finally get some local apples. This is family recipe is a must dessert every fall in our house. Basically, it’s an apple pie without the crust, so it’s super easy. The flour and baking powder add a little fluffiness between the pieces of apple, and if you add walnuts, you have that wonderful crunchiness and nutty flavor. The most time-consuming part is peeling, coring, and dicing the apples. I like it topped with a little bit of cream or whipped cream, and I never say no to warm pie with vanilla ice cream!


NAP USE2Naked Apple Pie
I like to use Cortland apples for my pies; if you use a sweeter apple, you can, of course, cut down on the sugar. It’s a perfect dessert to take along to a potluck!

½ c. white sugar
½ c. brown sugar
½ c. all-purpose flour
1 tsp. baking powder
Pinch of salt
1 egg
1 tsp. vanilla
6-7 peeled, pared, diced apples
½ c. nuts, optional (if using, I use walnuts)
Cinnamon and nutmeg

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
2. Mix together the dry ingredients in a large bowl.
3. Add the egg and vanilla and stir.
4. Add the apples and nuts, if using.
5. Top with cinnamon and nutmeg.

Bake in a greased pie pan or small cake pan for roughly 30 minutes, or until apples are soft.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Celebrity Chef Stamps!
stampsJust when I was wondering what this week’s endorsement was going to be, I saw this story!

I can’t believe it! Stamps of my favorite chefs! Julia Child! James Beard! You can be guaranteed I will be in line at my post office Saturday morning to pick up a sleeve or two of these! They’re so beautiful, they will only be used for letters only, no bills!

Warm Roasted Peaches and Cream

Apologies in advance to anyone who received the unwritten sneak peek at this story on Sunday. I’ve learned a valuable lesson, I’ve lost all capacity to multitask!

Each week I come home with lots of fruits and vegetables from the supermarket with the intention of cooking them up into delicious recipes, yet sometimes that doesn’t work out. An impulsive dinner out or a swifter dinner than planned because it’s late can change any evening. But instead of tossing out these limp and sad-looking orbs, I extend their life by roasting!

I know more than once I’ve extolled the virtues of roasting fruits and vegetables. If there is anything that looks like it has one foot in the compost pile, I cut it up, pop it in a pan with some olive oil, and roast. And the best thing about roasting is you can leave it in the oven and not worry how long to cook; sometimes the longer it cooks, the better it is!

Last fall I brought your roasted fall fruit—and we’re now getting into pear and apple season! This year, I wanted to extend summer a little bit further into September. One night when I was doing dishes, I noticed a bowl filled with peaches I had bought to make a pie but never got around to making. They were starting to turn and I either need to eat them or toss them; with the Eater of the House out of town, there was no way I was going to have my favorite pie on the counter—I’d be a full-sized kitchen when he returned home! But roasting them topped with a few drops of cream, that I could do.

After removing the skins, I added them to a oven-proof baking pan with a little bit of butter, a dash of sugar and nutmeg, and roasted them at 325 degrees for about 45 minutes. Once they start roasting, the juices come out, so just a little bit of the butter and sugar will go a long way–or use none at all if you prefer. Spooned into a bowl and with just a little bit of cream, I found it a very comforting and homey dessert.

The thermometer said it was in the 80s inside and I was a fool to turn on the oven, but for that evening, I was glad to extend the summertime heat for at least one more time.

peaches

Warm Roasted Peaches and Cream
Peaches, remove the skin with a paring knife
Butter, a couple of teaspoons
A sprinkle of sugar, white or brown, about 1 teaspoon
A few dashes of nutmeg and/or cinnamon
Cream for topping, optional

1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.

2. Add the sliced peaches to a pan and top with butter and nutmeg. Roast until the peaches are soft. When still warm, serve in a small dish with just a few drops of cream.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Try Something New!

watermelon radish
Do you know what this is?

I didn’t either until the other day. It’s a watermelon radish, which is an heirloom Chinese Daikon radish! (You can read more about it here.) But purchasing this got me thinking. Every week I usually buy the same fruits and vegetables, but I love it when I find something new to try! So if you’re at the farmer’s market or the coop, pick up a new-to-you fruit or vegetable. Don’t worry how to cook or prepare; there are a million recipes for everything on the Internet. So this week, try something new and expand your horizons; you might just find a new favorite! (My next vegetable to try is celery root. Ever seen one? They’re kind of scary looking, but people swear it’s delicious!)

celeryroot

 

Number 200

200What began during a March blizzard in 2011 as a creative way to get my adventures in the kitchen out into the world has developed into a weekly ritual of cooking and writing. In three years’ time, you’ve come along with me to specialty food shops in Florida, our local agricultural fair, and the sites of New York; my birthday tribute to Julia Child (when the electricity went out); I Mad Men’d myself for cocktails and Caesar salad; I’ve passed along family recipes, recipes I’ve created, and of course those from Cooking Light.

Despite being a pretty good home cook, I know there always is room to grow and for improvement. I recently made pancakes for my nephew who dubbed them good and gobbled them up, but when I bit into them, I realized I had forgotten the sugar! Well, at least my audience was happy! Just like everything in life, I am always learning and all I can do is to keep trying and mastering my craft. A big thank you to all who have been with me along the way, and a special thank you to Marta T., my very first follower who wasn’t related to me! And I can’t let this post escape with without thanking the Eater of the House, who has withstood experimental, delicious (and not so delicious), and really late dinners because of my writing and cooking! He is my first test taster, so nothing goes here without his seal of approval!

So since this is Post #200, I decided to give myself a reprieve this week and revisit my favorite pie recipe since it’s August and peach season. What better way to celebrate these beautiful golden orbs than with a pie?

peach pie

I can’t take credit for this pie; my Mom baked this beauty!


Crumbly Peach Pie
2/3 cup sugar (scant)
3/8 cup (6 Tablespoons) flour
1/3 cup (5 Tablespoons) butter (scant)
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg 6-8 peach halves, skinned

Mix the ingredients together and place half of the mixture at the bottom of a ready-to-bake pie crust. Place the peach halves on top and add the remainder of the crumbly mixture. Bake at 400 degrees for 10 minutes, then 325 degrees for 30 minutes or until golden.

To peel peaches: Fill a large pan with water and bring to a boil. In the sink, fill a large bowl with extra cold water. When the water has come to a boil, add the peaches one at a time and let it sit in the water for about 45 seconds to a minute. (The timing is very important, as you don’t want the peaches to cook.) Transfer immediately to the bowl of cold water. If everything goes well, you should be able to slip off the skins easily with your fingers. If you find they don’t, you can stick them in the hot water a little bit longer.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Tourterelle, New Haven, Vermont
For my 200th post, I thought I would give you a little peek at food in other kitchens in the state. Tourterelle is one of my favorite local restaurants that is one where we go for special occasions. The Eater of the House took me out a couple of weeks ago as a thank you for the pick up and drop off during a hiking excursion. French in theme, it’s a little country house that has a beautiful bar and several rooms where you can dine solo, à deux, or with a party.

I wasn’t very hungry that night, but that didn’t stop us from ordering the Salade de Homard (lobster salad), chunks of lobster with crunchy kohlrabi, radishes, a thin buttermilk dressing, and topped with puffed polenta. I could have eaten three of those alone! For my entrée, I ordered the Crêpe à la St Jacques, a thinly folded crepe with fresh sea scallops and wild mushrooms in a thin wine sauce. (If I were at home, I would have licked my plate!)

Unless it’s going to our local pub, I like to go to restaurants that serve food I can’t or won’t make at home. I know I will never even attempt to make crêpes at home, so this was a lovely evening out with absolutely delicious food. So this week, let someone else do the cooking and tell me about your adventures!
lobstercrepe

Forget No Gluten, No Dairy, and Your Diet: It’s Strawberry Shortcake Time!

berries
The strawberry season in Vermont consists of, if we’re lucky, two and a half weeks. With all due respect to California and Florida, you don’t know strawberries until you’ve had a Vermont one in July. Red, ripe, and juicy, set aside the sugar; they are sweet just on their own. I’m lucky there is a farm about three miles away and I can either pick my own or buzz up and get a couple of quarts to tide me over for the next couple of days, and to freeze, so I can have a little bit of summer in the colder months.

When I was growing up, there was always one night that we would have strawberry shortcake for dinner. That’s right, nothing but strawberry shortcake. And despite everything I know nutrition-wise, I have continued this tradition. I just can’t let a July evening go by without making biscuits and homemade whipped cream with fresh strawberries.

This is the way I grew up eating it, a bit biscuit-like “cake,” split it in the middle, fill the middle with whipped cream and lots of berries, and then top with more whipped cream and berries. While the Egg Biscuit Cake is from The New England Cookbook, by Brooke Dojny, the assembling instructions and whipped cream recipe are my own.

Luckily for myself and the eater of the house, the heat and humidity finally broke, so much so I needed to turn on the oven to warm up the kitchen! My suggestion would be if you have a small family to either make this for a dinner party or instead of making a cake, divide into drop biscuits. It really doesn’t last past a day. But then, there is always breakfast!

strawHomemade Strawberry Shortcake
1+ quart of strawberries, hulled and sliced (set aside eight perfect berries)

Egg Biscuit Cake
This cake recipe is published in The New England Cookbook by Brooke Dojny, 1999.

2 cups all-purpose flour
¼ cup sugar
4 teaspoons baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into about 10 pieces
1 egg
½ cup milk

1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Generously grease an 8-inch cake pan.

2. Pulse the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a food processor. Distribute the butter over the flour mixture and pulse until the mixture looks crumbly. Whisk the egg with the milk in a glass measuring cup. With the motor running, pour the milk mixture through the feed tube and process just until the dough begins to clump together. (To make the dough by hand, whisk the dry ingredients together in a bowl, work in the cold butter with your fingertips, add the egg and milk and stir with a large fork to make a soft dough.) Scrape out onto a lightly floured board, knead lightly a few times, and roll or pat into an 8-inch round. (The dough can be prepared several hours ahead and refrigerated at this point.)

3. Transfer the dough to the prepared pan, patting it gently to the edges. Place in the oven and immediately reduce the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for 22 to 26 minutes until the shortcake is pale golden brown on top. Cool in the pan on a rack for about 10 minutes.

Homemade Whipped Cream
1 pint of heavy or whipping cream
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2-3 teaspoons vanilla extract

Pour the cream into a large bowl. Add the sugar and vanilla. With a hand mixer set on high, beat the cream until stiff peaks form—about 6 minutes or so. Set aside.

To assemble
Take the shortcake out of the pan and carefully slice it in half horizontally and divide. With the bottom of the shortcake, add some whipped cream and berries. Add the top of the shortcake, add more berries, whipped cream, and dot with the reserved whole berries.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week

Look at this gorgeous kale patch!

Look at this gorgeous kale patch!

Before I went home to a ton of strawberries, the Eater of the House and myself were lucky enough to be invited for a front-row seat to watch our local Fourth of July parade at our friends, Jo and Emmett’s house. Both eaters, readers, cooks, and artists, Emmett took me on a tour of his flower and vegetable gardens as I looked with envy. Living here on Bunny Hill, vegetables had a way of not making it to the dinner table, so I gave up vegetable gardening a long time ago.

Jo pointed out the kale and said she already had made my kale chips once this season, which reminded me I needed to make a batch myself!

So this week’s endorsement is make some kale chips! They are healthy, delicious, and low in calories–a terrific snack to counter-balance the shortcake!

Retro Dessert: Floating Island

One of my all-time favorite movies is “Desk Set.” A little known Tracy and Hepburn film, Katharine Hepburn plays a research librarian at a television network in New York City; Spencer Tracy plays an efficiency expert. It’s great fun and I watch it every December because the movie starts in November and a big scene takes place at Christmastime. (So I was especially excited to go to Rockefeller Center last December to live my version of the movie!)

Desk_Set_4
There is a scene where, following a big rain storm, Tracy is soaked and ends up having dinner at Hepburn’s apartment; he makes her fried chicken and she makes floating island for dessert. Her boyfriend shows up, suspects their cozy dinner is something other than what it is, and assumptions and confusion ensues. Of course, it ends happily.

I’ve been making this dessert since the first time I saw this movie probably 20 years ago. A soft custard pudding, it has a meringue “island” floating on top. It is a perfectly comforting and homey dessert that takes little time and makes just the right amount for two. I had to research the history of this dessert and I thought it was American through and through,  but turns out it is European!

Floating Island
This recipe, from Betty Crocker’s New Dinner For Two Cook Book, says to make this in a double boiler. If you don’t have one, like me, a thick-bottomed saucepan works just as well.

Make Soft Custard (below). Make a meringue of 1 egg white and 2 tbsp. sugar. Drop meringue as “islands” on custard in serving dish. Chill before serving. (MVK’s Note: Making the meringue takes about 10 minutes at least with a hand mixer set on high.)

Soft Custard
¾ cup milk
2 egg yolks (or 1 whole egg)
2 tbsp. sugar
Pinch of salt
½ tsp. vanilla

Scald milk in top of a double boiler over direct head. Beat egg yolks in a small bowl. Blend in sugar and salt. Gradually stir in scalded milk. Return to double boiler. Cook over simmering (not boiling) water, stirring constantly. When custard coats silver spoon (thin coating), remove from heat. Cook quickly. If custard should start to curdle, beat vigorously at once with rotary beater until smooth. Blend in vanilla. Pour into serving dish. 2 generous servings.
DSCN4259

A Homemade Valentine’s Day Dinner

I thought I’d pop in early this week to pass along a Valentine’s Day dinner menu for you in case you were thinking of making a special meal on Friday night! I’m not one to really celebrate Valentine’s Day, but I never need an excuse to make a nice dinner. Restaurants always raise their prices and they’re usually packed, so I usually opt for making a special dinner at home. CookingVintageValentineSince Friday is a work night, the choices on this menu is special enough for the holiday, yet easy enough to put together after a long week at the office.

So let’s start with cocktails! Since it’s a special night, it calls for making a special cocktail! Care to go retro? Try my ManhattanIf you want to splurge on the juice, try a pomegranate martini. Or if your meal is on the spicy side, how about a margarita?  

You must have something to serve alongside your cocktails! The stuffed mushroom recipe I make is easy, and you can make these the night before and just pop them in the oven when you get home. If you have extra time, this recipe for gougères is to die for, and are best right out of the oven–just don’t burn your tongue! Or this recipe for Artichoke Dip is always a crowd favorite. If it’s just the two of you, you can refrigerate the leftovers and warm the next evening and it will still be delicious.

Soup or salad? I will always go for salad whenever given the choice. You could make a simple salad of  greens but include something special like avocado or my favorite, Hearts of Palms. These run about $3+ a can, so I buy them only on rare occasions. Maybe a few grape tomatoes, a quick vinaigrette, and you’re set!

I always think seafood makes a special meal. You could make this scallop recipe (and forego the aforementioned salad), or linguini with clam sauce, which is quick and easy. Or what about this salmon recipe? Just pop the fish in the oven and make the quick sauce on the stove. If you have a little extra time and money, this Brazilian Stew is fantastic! A bit of crusty bread and dinner is served!

Dessert anyone? If you want something chocolaty, you could make these brownies the night before and serve warmed with a little bit of vanilla ice cream. Or what about gingerbread? This cozy cake is another recipe you can make in advance. Of course, one of the most special recipes of all is Julia Child’s chocolate mousse. This must be made in advance, so that way it will be ready and you can focus on the rest of the meal.

Whatever you have or make for dinner on Friday, whether it’s an elaborate four course dinner or takeout pizza, I hope you can share it with someone you love. Happy Valentine’s Day!

Coconut Orange Refrigerator Cookies

This time of year, I always keep the makings for different kinds of cookies in the cupboard. Mainly because I never know when I’m going to be snowbound–or in the case of our recent weather, house bound, because it’s so cold! While I love a lazy day at home, around 3 p.m. I start getting stir crazy. One year I was stuck inside for two days during a massive blizzard and made a different batch each day. Forty-eight hours later when the plow man arrived with a backhoe to “plow” the driveway, I was able to give him a bag of homemade cookies!

These cookies are an old family recipe and I love making them in the winter because I always have a fresh orange in the fridge (although you can always use dried orange rind, too). Yes, I use shortening, but you can substitute butter, which would make then even more like a flavored shortbread. Also, you can substitute a teaspoon of lemon juice instead of extract which is what I always do. They’re especially sweet, so you can always have a cup with your morning tea and coffee and call them a biscuit!

DSCN4207
Coconut Orange Cookies
The original recipe says to bake at 400 degrees with 8-10 minutes. Maybe it’s my oven, but that always leaves me with hard, burned cookies. I baked this latest batch at 350 degrees for about 13 minutes, watching them carefully. I pulled them out a bit early when they were underdone, but once they cooled, they were perfect. They freeze well, too.

1 cup sugar
¼ cup brown sugar
1 cup shortening
1 tsp. lemon extract (or juice)
2 Tbs. orange rind
2 eggs

3 cups all-purpose flour
3 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. salt
1/2-3/4 cup of unsweetened coconut

1. In a mixing bowl, cream together the sugars, shortening, lemon extract or juice, orange rind, and eggs.

2. In another mixing bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, salt, and coconut.

3. Gently add the flour to the wet mixture, using a hand mixer, until it is well mixed together.

4. Chill the cookie mixture in the fridge. (For at least a half an hour or until you’re ready to bake.) Roll out and cut into cookies or roll into balls. Bake at 400 degrees for 8-10 minutes.

Merry Christmas!

vintage_christmas_girl_baking_cookies_poster-p228519991634616872836v_500 I thought I would pop in early this week to wish you a Merry Christmas and to give you one last holiday recipe for 2013! And it is one you can easily make to serve on Christmas morning if you like!

I love eggnog and eggnog flavored anything, be it ice cream, lattes, or coffee. Anytime I see something eggnog flavored, I will try it! So when I found this recipe for Eggnog Coffee Cake, I knew I had to make it.

Moist, easy to make, I cut this into half and tucked some into the freezer for a lazy Sunday morning later on this winter!

Merry Christmas!

Eggnog Coffee Cake
This recipe originally appeared in the December 2013 issue of Cooking Light.

Crumble:

1/4 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, chilled
1/4 cup chopped pecans, toasted

Cake:

6.75 ounces all-purpose flour (about 1 1/2 cups)
1 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1 large egg
1 large egg yolk
1/2 cup 2% reduced-fat milk
1/4 cup reduced-fat sour cream
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
Baking spray with flour

Preparation
1. Preheat oven to 350°.

2. To prepare crumble, combine first 4 ingredients in a bowl, stirring with a whisk. Cut in 2 tablespoons butter using a pastry blender or two knives until mixture resembles coarse meal. Stir in toasted pecans.

3. To prepare cake, weigh or lightly spoon 6.75 ounces flour into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Combine 6.75 ounces flour and next 4 ingredients (through 1/4 teaspoon salt); stir with a whisk. Place 3 tablespoons butter and granulated sugar in a medium bowl; beat with a mixer at medium speed until well combined. Add whole egg and egg yolk, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition. Add milk, sour cream, and vanilla; beat at low speed for 1 minute or until well combined. Add the flour mixture; beat at low speed 1 minute or just until combined.

4. Spoon half of batter into an 8-inch round metal cake pan coated with baking spray. Sprinkle with half of crumble mixture. Spread remaining batter over crumble, smoothing top with a spatula. Sprinkle evenly with remaining crumble mixture. Bake at 350° for 30 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pan on a wire rack for 15 minutes. Place a plate upside down on top of cake; invert onto plate. Place another plate upside down on top of cake; invert onto plate.

Roasted Fall Fruit

You probably wouldn't recognize the crabapple tree this time of year. The bows are heavy with the tiny apples.

You probably wouldn’t recognize the crabapple tree this time of year. The boughs are heavy with the tiny apples.

If you have the urge to make a quick dessert this month, but you don’t want to go to the effort of making a pie, cake, or cookies, this is the perfect time of year to roast late summer and fall fruit. Yes, the technique just like you would vegetables! By slow cooking, the sugar comes out and makes a delicious  compote that is as comforting as pudding.

I have roasted both peaches and pears (separately) and they are fabulous. Just remove the skin, slice thinly, and place into a mixing bowl. Add a dash of sugar (brown, white, or a mixture), a dash of cinnamon and nutmeg, and a little bit of butter. Place into a oven-proof pan and cook at 325 degrees until the fruit is soft. You can serve this with cream, ice cream, or just on its own.

The beauty in this recipe is it’s a “set it and forget it” kind of dessert. (Please forgive the quip, but it’s true!) You can put it in the oven if you are roasting a chicken or during dinner if you have guests. Of course, if you actually do forget it in the oven, it can overcook, but it would have to be in there for hours for that to happen. Just keep an eye on the clock and cook no more than an hour.

* * * *

Sometimes I read stories in the newspaper that just make me smile. (Believe me, these days, that is rare.) So when I read this story the other night, I knew I had to share it, since it relates to the enjoyment of dining with others.

Enjoy!

A Nightly Dinner Out That’s Like Therapy

Jordan Marsh’s Blueberry Muffins

Each summer, the farmers  always are dependent on the weather for good crops. Our cold, wet rainy early summer which turned into a weeks-long heat wave gave us poor strawberries and late green beans. But one fruit, blueberries, seem to be thriving from the heat. I started seeing local ones in the middle of July, which I think is earlier than normal. And they are fabulous this year. So fabulous, that I was craving blueberry muffins one day.

I like blueberry muffins that are extra moist and filled with little bursts of fruit. One Friday morning on my way to work, I decided to treat myself for a work week well done and stopped by a high-end bakery with hopes they would have some muffins. They did, flavored with honeysuckle. And they were $3 each. Against my better judgment, I decided to splurge, but honestly, it was terrible; dry, hardly any berries, and the top was crumbly with no moistness whatsoever. I knew I could make better and less expensive muffins at home. So I went to my trusty copy of The Essential New York Times Cook Book and knew Amanda Hesser would have the answer.

Jordan Marsh was a famous department store in the Boston area until  it was taken over by Macy’s in the 1990s. I lived in Chelsea, Massachusetts, for a couple of summer months in the late 1980s, and on one of my rare afternoons off from work, I took the train into the city and just walked around the makeup counter of Jordan Marsh. We didn’t have department stores like that in Vermont, and I loved the bright lights and big city. It’s a wonderful memory. And this muffin recipe was exactly what I was looking for; an extra moist muffin bursting with fresh blueberries. Adding the crushed berries really ups the fruit flavor

Helpful Kitchen Hint: When I make muffins, I usually use a wooden spoon to mix the ingredients. But because of creaming the butter and sugar, I pulled out my hand mixer. It made things go quickly!

With a cup of tea on a lazy Sunday morning, I couldn’t resist so I had one right out of the oven. With just one bite, my craving was gone and I was in heaven.

Yes, you are correct. One muffin is missing! I couldn't resist!

Yes, you are correct. One muffin is missing! I couldn’t resist!

Jordan Marsh’s Blueberry Muffins

From The Essential New York Times Cook Book, by Amanda Hesser

2 cups all-purpose flour
½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons baking powder
8 tablespoons (one stick) unsalted butter, softened
1 ¼ cups plus 1 tablespoon sugar
2 large eggs
½ cup whole milk
2 cups blueberries, rinsed and picked over

1. Heat the oven to 375 degrees. Grease 12 large muffin cups. Sift together the flour, salt, and baking powder.

2. Cream the butter and 1 ¼ cups sugar in a large bowl until light. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add to the flour mixture alternating with the milk, beating just until smooth.

3. Crush ½ cup blueberries with a fork, and mix into the batter. Fold in the remaining whole berries.

4. Fill the muffin cups with batter. Sprinkle with the remaining tablespoon of sugar over the tops of the muffins. Bake until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 30 minutes. Cool for 30 minutes before removing from the pan.

5. Store, uncovered, or the muffins will be too moist the second day—if they last that long.

Cook’s Notes:
I completely forgot about topping the muffins with the extra sugar, so if you forget, they are still delicious. And Hesser is right about being moist the next day; I layered them in a container and they were so moist they stuck to each other. But, of course, that didn’t matter, they were still delicious!