Tamale Chicken Potpies

It’s January, which that means we’re due for a deep freeze. And we’re right on course; the last week and more we’ve seen sub-zero temps for days at a time. So when the thermometer dips, I always look for meals to cook in the oven to heat up the kitchen. This potpie was a perfect solution; it’s healthy, easy to make on a weeknight, plus it’s baked in the oven so it warmed both the house and myself!

I don’t have individual ramekins, so I made this in a 1 3/4-quart casserole dish, and although it went over the edges a little bit, I would still say it was a success. I feel like I sound like a broken record, I found it “warm and comforting,” but I really did! That’s my kind of supper this time of year. I served this with a crisp, green salad, although the suggested black beans would be a perfect complement!

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Tamale Chicken Potpies

This recipe originally appeared in the November 2014 issue of Cooking Light.

Serve these individual potpies with a side of spicy black beans: Heat 2 teaspoons canola oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add 1/2 cup diced green bell pepper and 2 minced garlic cloves; sauté until soft. Stir in 1 (15-ounce) can rinsed and drained black beans, 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice, and 1/2 teaspoon grated lime rind; cook until thoroughly heated (about 5 minutes). Stir in 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper, if desired.

Serves 4

2 teaspoons canola oil
1 cup chopped onion
12 ounces ground chicken
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
1 cup chopped zucchini
3/4 cup fresh corn kernels
1 (10-ounce) can diced tomatoes and green chiles, undrained
1 (8-ounce) can unsalted tomato sauce
Cooking spray
1/2 cup coarsely ground yellow cornmeal
1 1/2 cups water, divided
3 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, shredded and divided (about 3/4 cup)

Preheat oven to 400°.

Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add onion; sauté 3 minutes. Add chicken; cook 3 minutes, stirring to crumble. Stir in cumin, chili powder, and 1/4 teaspoon salt; cook 1 minute. Add zucchini, corn, tomatoes, and tomato sauce; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer 8 minutes, stirring occasionally. Divide chicken mixture evenly among 4 (10-ounce) ramekins coated with cooking spray. Place ramekins on a jelly-roll pan.

Place remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, cornmeal, and 1/2 cup water in a medium bowl, stirring to combine. Bring remaining 1 cup water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Gradually add cornmeal mixture to pan; cook 3 minutes or until thickened, stirring frequently. Stir in 2 ounces cheese. Divide cornmeal mixture evenly among ramekins. Sprinkle evenly with remaining 1 ounce cheese. Bake at 400° for 15 minutes or until light golden brown.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Animal Farm’s Butter!
A while back I brought you the recipe for Chicken Stew with Old South Buttermilk Biscuits, made with the buttermilk from Animal Farm in Orwell, Vermont. At the time, I told you about Diane St. Clair’s incredible butter that is nothing like you’ve ever tasted (it’s $19 a pound, so at that price it’s like eating gold!). Last month a local television station did a story on St. Clair, her cows and farm, and her butter that she sends to top chef Thomas Keller’s Per Se restaurant in New York City.

It’s a fun story and you can watch it here, Butter Makes Its Mark at NYC Restaurant.

Perfect for a Potluck: Barley, Corn, and Provolone Bake

Maybe it’s a Vermont thing, but I find several times a year we’re invited to a potluck supper. Everyone brings a dish to share, be it appetizers, casseroles, or desserts and I always love these, since I like to take a little taste of everything. A couple of weeks ago I was lamenting what to take to a potluck supper. I admit, sometimes cooking for a crowd has lost its appeal of late; so many people have food allergies, it sort of takes the winds out of my sails when I am deciding what to make. This time, I decided to make a homey casserole that I brought warm. And it was perfect—and I went home with an empty dish! Please note, this is barley, so it contains gluten and cheese, but it was the perfect dish to warm you up before an evening of dancing. And this would be a great weeknight dish to put together; just cook the barley in the morning when you’re fixing breakfast and lunch! My only switch was I used a cup of frozen corn. This was delicious and I plan on making again for dinner for two!

barleyBarley, Corn, and Provolone Bake
This recipe originally appeared in the November 2000 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 3/4 cup).

3 1/2 cups water
3/4 teaspoon salt — divided
1 cup uncooked pearl barley
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 1/2 cups chopped sweet onion
1 cup corn kernels — fresh (about 2 ears)
1 cup diced red bell pepper — (about 1 large)
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3/4 cup provolone cheese — or fontina, or part-skim mozzarella (3 ounces)
Cooking spray

1. Combine water and 1/4 teaspoon salt in a large saucepan; bring to a boil. Add barley. Return to a boil; cover, reduce heat, and simmer 45 minutes. Remove from heat; let stand, covered, 5 minutes.
2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
3. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add onion and corn; saute 6 minutes. Add bell pepper; saute 3 minutes. Stir in cooked barley, 1/2 teaspoon salt, parsley, thyme, and black pepper. Remove from heat; stir in cheese. Spoon into a 2-quart casserole coated with cooking spray; cover with lid. Bake at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. Uncover; bake an additional 5 minutes.

england's flagMVK Eats London, Part Deux
(To read Part One, click here.)

A month or so before we left on our trip, our friend, Jen, asked me what I thought about a sunrise breakfast at the tallest building in London. Yes please! So at the ungodly hour of 5:30 Monday morning, we got up for 6:30 breakfast reservations at the Duck and Waffle restaurant atop the Heron Building. As we took the glass elevator to the tippy top of London, we all looked at each other with sleepy eyes and said, “this better be worth it.” And it exceeded all of our expectations! I thought the restaurant would be full, but we were just one of three tables. (As an aside, at the table next to us were seated two players from the Dallas Cowboys, who played an exhibition game in London the night before. And they won, too! Thanks for the mimosas, guys!) Seated in a rounded booth that overlooked the city, we were able to watch the sky grow light and every five minutes or so, everything came into view, so we kept getting up and taking more pictures. London Bridge, the Gherkin building, everything grew more and more beautiful as the sun came up. Oh, and breakfast was delicious! I got an egg scramble with avocado which was really yummy, Jen got the Duck and Waffle (when in London!), and the Eater of the House got the traditional English breakfast. Two pots of tea, our stomachs full, we headed out for a very long day of walking and sightseeing. (As an aside, Jen cooked up blood sausage [or blood pudding, as it is sometimes called, which is definitely not pudding!] she brought back from Scotland for my first British breakfast! Don’t think about the name and don’t look up what it is, but if you ever have the opportunity to try it, I found it delicious! And was thrilled when I found some in my local meat market when I got home, although I didn’t find it as good as the “real” thing.)

 

The view from atop London.

The view from atop London.

For those of you who are book lovers, I just had to share this with you. 84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff is one of my favorite books of all time. For decades, Hanff corresponded with this small London bookshop, buying books from them. It is a lovely story, and one that I discovered while in London is truly American. While I knew the shop was no longer there, I knew there was a plaque somewhere on a building. We walked up and down Charing Cross Road several times and for the life of me I couldn’t find number 84. I went into 82, they didn’t know. I went into a bookshop, the clerk didn’t know. I went into another bookshop and the clerk said, “yes, it’s there.” But where? “It’s there,” was all he said. So I said I’ll walk up the street one more time and after that I give up. I expected the plaque to be eye-level, but when I looked up, there it was. My Holy Grail. I’ll admit I got very weepy when I found it; I’ll just blame it on jet lag and the early morning rise, but I tend to get emotional over sentimental things. So the photo of me in front of it has me with a red face and teary eyes. Oh well.

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This statue outside the National Gallery was in honor of the World War I soldiers.

This statue outside the National Gallery was in honor of the World War I soldiers.

Like I said, Monday was a BUSY day! We walked to the Tower of London to see the poppies dedicated for World War I, the National Portrait Gallery, National Gallery, then we walked down to Parliament, past Downing Street, Westminster Abbey, and down to the St. Ermin’s Hotel, because I had a date with Jen for high tea! We selected this hotel because they have their own bees and make honey, but we didn’t see any bees–or did we have any honey! Finger sandwiches and lots of sweets and delicious tea. It was a wonderful way to loll away an afternoon. But we couldn’t stay too late, we had a date with best-selling author David Mitchell! After the reading and having our books signed, we went out for tapas in SoHo, this time Peruvian, but I was so tired and hungry I didn’t take any pictures, but trust me, it was an amazing meal.

Look at the cute shelf they use for our sandwiches and goodies!

Look at the cute shelf they used for our sandwiches and sweet treats! And I loved that my china was in my favorite color–pink!

Off to Cambridge for an overnighter! Just a quick 40-minute train ride, and you are off in another land of academia and tiny bookshops. It was lovely and the architecture was incredible. We had lunch in The Eagle Pub, where in 1953 Francis Crick announced that he and James Watson discovered DNA! No announcements that day, although I’d like to announce I had a great plate of fish and chips! I also discovered a food treat at our B & B that I’ve been making since we got home, bircher muesli. Basically, yogurt with muesli or oatmeal and apples, stir, and then everything is nice and soft when you go and eat it. It’s delicious!

 

Cambridge.

Cambridge University.

Our goodbye dinner was at Simpsons On the Strand. I had wavered back and forth if this was a good decision, but we all agreed it was as we left the restaurant. My parents had eaten there more than 30 years ago and had told me what a special time they had, so I wanted to replicate the evening. And we did. My other BFF from Switzerland “popped” over for a quick weekend, so her joining us made the evening extra special. Simpsons is a London landmark, and if you order the beef, they will bring the huge roast to your table and carve it for you right there. Beware all vegetarians of the below photo! I like my beef rare, and this was cooked perfectly and just the right portion, too. Thinly sliced with freshly grated horseradish, I was in heaven. It was a lovely way to end an incredible week in London.

simpsons2

simpsons1

simpsons3
A quick girls only walk in the morning before we headed to the train station to go back to Heathrow. We did so much during these days and I only touched the surface with my stories! Tea in Hyde Park! Tea at Fortum and Mason! A stroll through Selfridges department store’s amazing food court! How my Munich-made, via Zurich, via London white sausages were confiscated at customs! (But I was able to keep the cheese!) And so many delicious meals! But alas our fabulous journey had to come to an end and we had to go back to reality.

And this was MY reality Monday morning!

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Turkey (or Chicken) Tetrazzini

Every year when Thanksgiving rolls around, I see lots of recipes online and in cooking magazines of how to use up the leftover turkey and I always find a recipe for Turkey Tetrazzini. I’ll be honest, I’ve never made it before, I don’t even know if I’ve eaten it before, but I knew it was a dish of turkey, mushrooms, and noodles in a creamy sauce. So one day when I found some leftover Thanksgiving turkey in the freezer, I decided to set out create my own dish!

Both times I’ve made this it’s been weekend evenings, and while I’ll admit it’s not exactly time consuming, it uses a lot of pots and pans, so there’s a bit of cleanup. I’ve made this with turkey and chicken, and both were delicious (with an enthusiastic thumbs up from the eater of the house).  It’s also a flexible dish, and you can add more veggies if you want. I tried to cut down on some of the calories by using some chicken broth in the cream sauce, so it’s not as rich as it could be but is still flavorful. We’re still in comfort food weather here, so this is a perfect weekend meal, served with a side salad or steamed broccoli.

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It doesn’t appear it by the photo, but there are mushrooms in this dish!

Turkey (or Chicken) Tetrazzini

2 teaspoons olive oil
1 cup chopped red pepper (about one pepper)
¼ cup chopped red onion
1 ½ cups chopped mushrooms

2 Tablespoons butter
2 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
¼ cup milk
¼ cup chicken broth or stock
A splash of white wine or vermouth (optional)

½ pound of spaghetti (whole grain preferred), broken in half
2 cups cooked turkey or chicken, diced
1 Tablespoons panko or breadcrumbs

1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees.

2. Heat the olive oil in a medium-sized skillet. Add the peppers and onions, cook for a couple of minutes, then add the mushrooms. Cook for about four minutes until the veggies are no longer hard, but are not completely soft. Add to a large mixing bowl.

3. While the vegetables are cooking, fill a Dutch oven with water and bring to a boil. Add the spaghetti and cook for 7 minutes. Drain and add to the veggies.

4. Melt the butter in a small saucepan. Add the flour and whisk until it is a thick paste. Slowly add the milk, whisking the whole time. Add the stock, and continue whisking until the mixture is a thin sauce. (*Note: If it’s still thick, just add a little more liquid, either milk or stock, and whisk.) Add the wine or vermouth if adding. Season with salt and pepper. Add to the mixing bowl.

5. Add the cooked turkey or chicken to the mixing bowl and mix thoroughly. Add it to a greased casserole dish and sprinkle with the panko or bread crumbs.

6. Bake covered for about 20 minutes.