Goodbye 2014! Hello 2015!

newyear4I am one of those people who laps up year-end lists. Give me the best books, best movies (and worst), best TV shows, I love reading them and seeing if any of my favorites made it. So why should I be any different? I love that I can look at my stats on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis, but what I find really interesting are the yearly stats. Who knew MVK was so popular in Brazil, Canada, and Italy? But what I found even more interesting, was the five most searched for recipes throughout the year.

2014 Reader Favorites

Dark and Moist Gingerbread

Baked Artichoke Dip

Chris’s Chi-Chi Beans

Floating Island

Mad Men Caesar Salad and Manhattan Cocktail

So I decided to go to the archives and select what I thought were the best recipes of the year, either those I liked creating—or eating!

2014 MVK Favorites

Mediterranean Kebabs

Mocktails

Nicoise Salad

Pasta with Shrimp, Garlic, and Asparagus

Honey-Glazed Pork Chops + Tomato Salad + Corn Cakes

I obviously like summertime cooking!

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Blackeye Peas for Good Luck on Thursday!

I’m not one for superstitions, but I always fix a batch of blackeye peas for New Year’s Day. I created this simple recipe a couple of years ago and it’s been my standby every New Year’s Day. When cooked, blackeye peas swell which symbolizes prosperity, the greens represent money, and because when pigs forage they go forward, the meat symbolizes positive motion!

So here is to good luck and good eating in 2015!

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Good Luck Peas
Just omit the meat for a vegetarian version and it will taste just as good! Spinach, Swiss chard, or kale can be substituted for the collard greens.

2 tsp olive oil
3-4 cloves of garlic, minced
½ medium onion, finely diced
3 cups of greens, chopped
1 14 oz. can blackeye peas
1 ¼ cup chopped ham, sausage, or kielbasa (optional), cooked
Salt and pepper to taste

1. Warm the olive oil in a large skillet. Add the garlic and onion and sauté until soft.

2. Add the meat, if using, and saute until warm.

3. Add the greens and sauté until wilted.

Happy New Year! May Your 2014 Be Bright!

“Hope
Smiles from the threshold of the year to come
Whispering, ‘it will be happier…'”
Alfred Tennyson

photo

After the ice storm.

I’ve never been one to be superstitious, but I am beginning to believe in the unlucky Number 13. While this year has had the highest of highs (trips to Florida, Newburyport, Maine, and New York City; a springtime visit from my friend, Kats, from Switzerland; hiking all over the state; and MVK’s collaboration with Cooking Light magazine), it also has had some incredible personal lows. A special thank you to my friend, Catherine, and the Eater of the House who have allowed me to keep on writing in the interim.

So cheers and Happy New Year! I, for one, am excited to turn the calendar to a new year. And on Wednesday, I am going to make a double batch of my black-eyed peas and collard greens that I posted last January for good luck, just in case!

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Good Luck Peas
Just omit the ham for a vegetarian version and it will taste just as good! Spinach or Swiss chard can be substituted for the collard greens.

2 teaspoons olive oil
3-4 cloves of garlic, minced
½ medium onion, finely diced
3 cups of collard greens, chopped
1 14 oz. can black-eyed peas
1 ¼ cup chopped ham (optional and gluten-free)
Salt and pepper to taste

1. Warm the olive oil in a large skillet. Add the garlic and onion and sauté until soft.

2. Add the collard greens and sauté until they are wilted.

3. Add the peas and ham, if using. Stir and turn heat to low. Add salt and pepper and serve!

Good Luck for the Coming Year!

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I hope everyone had a lovely New Year’s Eve with lots of merriment and good food! A quick stop for cocktails at our local pub ended up being dinner instead of appetizers, but I was in bed by 11:30 and I couldn’t keep my eyes open for midnight, so the new year was rung in without my cheering. But that’s OK, I was just as glad to say goodbye to 2012 and wake to a new year full of possibilities!

Since I tend to be of the superstitious type, New Year’s Day doesn’t go by without eating some black-eyed peas for good luck! I whipped this dish up after a short hike in the afternoon and the aroma coming out of the pan was mouth-watering. Collard greens are my new favorite go-to winter greens. Less bitter than kale, but sweeter and heartier than Swiss chard or spinach, they add delicious flavor and great nutrients to any dish. Before chopping, treat them like kale, pulling them off of their firm stems.

No matter that it’s January 2nd, I think you’ll feel your luck turning after a nice warm bowl of these peas! It also takes about 30-40 minutes from start to eating!

DSCN0064

Good Luck Peas
Just omit the ham for a vegetarian version. It will taste just as good!

2 teaspoons olive oil
3-4 cloves of garlic, minced
½ medium onion, finely diced
3 cups of collard greens, chopped
1 14 oz. can black-eyed peas
1 ¼ cup chopped ham (optional and gluten-free)
Salt and pepper to taste

1. Warm the olive oil in a large skillet. Add the garlic and onion and saute until soft.

2. Add the collard greens and sauté until they are wilted.

3. Add the peas and ham, if using. Stir and turn heat to low. Add salt and pepper and serve!