Recipe Revival: Brazilian Fish Stew Plus MVK’s Like of the Week

This summer has been busy—and the last two weeks have been HOT! Dinners have consisted of fresh vegetables, cold cucumber soup, and cooking on the grill. But as I was thinking of what recipe I was going to bring you this week, I remembered this favorite of mine that I first wrote about in 2013 and thought it was perfect timing–you can celebrate the end of the Olympics this weekend with a rich, spicy fish stew!

While this recipe isn’t complicated, it does take a fair amount time, so I always make it on a weekend when I have extra. And I usually buy cod in place of the halibut or sea bass, but you can substitute with another white fish if you prefer. This is a dish that is special enough for guests or a marked occasion; you could serve a crisp white wine, a simple salad with vegetables from your garden or the farmer’s market, and maybe some fresh crusty bread to sop up the leftovers.

I haven’t watched the Olympics in years; I only know what’s going on by reading the news headlines. But make this Sunday evening to watch the finale, or do what I plan on doing; once the heat wave breaks, it will make a perfect fall meal!

fishstewuse

Brazilian Fish Stew
Originally published in the September 2001 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

This recipe calls for sea bass or halibut, but I always substitute a light, white fish, usually cod. 

1/3 cup fresh lime juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 (1 1/2-pound) sea bass or halibut fillet, cut into 1/2-inch wide strips
1 1/2 pounds large shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 tablespoons olive oil

2 cups finely chopped onion
1 cup finely chopped green bell pepper
1 cup finely chopped red bell pepper
3/4 cup minced green onions (about 1 bunch)
5 garlic cloves, minced
1 bay leaf
2 cups chopped tomato (about 2 large)
1/2 cup minced fresh cilantro, divided
2 (8-ounce) bottles clam juice
1 (14 1/2-ounce) can fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
1 cup light coconut milk
1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper

1. Combine first 6 ingredients in a large bowl; toss to coat. Marinate in refrigerator 30 minutes.

2. Heat oil in a large Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onion, bell peppers, green onions, garlic, and bay leaf; cook 6 minutes, stirring occasionally. Increase heat to medium-high; add tomato, and cook 2 minutes. Add 1/4 cup cilantro, clam juice, and broth. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, and simmer 10 minutes. Discard bay leaf.

3. Place one-third of vegetable mixture in a blender, and puree until smooth. Pour pureed vegetable mixture into pan. Repeat procedure with remaining vegetable mixture. Add coconut milk and red pepper to pureed vegetable mixture. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat; cook 3 minutes. Add fish mixture; cook 3 minutes or until fish is done. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup cilantro.

MVK’s Like of the Week: Tiny Changes to Lose Poundsscale
I, like many people, am always looking for tips on how to lose weight. And I don’t want the advice to be take a magic pill or to eat the latest fad Dr. Oz is peddling. These ten tips actually are helpful and logical!

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Simple Caesar Dressing

 

 

Spring has finally sprung in Vermont!

Spring has finally sprung in Vermont!

I’m back! Did you miss your Wednesday dose of Vermont recipes? In the last two weeks I’ve traveled to two states with my best friends and let someone else do the cooking for a change. It was a treat to not have to think about what was for dinner and having to do clean-up duty, but I admit it is nice to be back home in the comfort of my kitchen. The first night back, guess what was on the menu? My comfort standby, roast chicken, my favorite melted green beans, and Caesar salad.

I admit I am a Caesar salad snob. If it is on a menu in a restaurant, I will almost always try it—and am almost always disappointed. For me, Caesar salad dressing needs to be a perfect combination of lemon, fish, and cheese and I find most are not that way. But now I’ve found a perfect recipe that I can make at home that fits my criteria!

Remember around the end of March when I gave you this recipe for Brussels sprouts that used a little bit of fish sauce? If you bought a bottle at that time and wonder what else you can make with it, don’t worry, you’ll be making this recipe once a week from now on! I admit it is a bit more tedious than I like in the kitchen with all the measuring, but in the end it is well worth it! I’ve used it as dressing for other salads and it’s just a good!

I’m not one for croutons on my salad, although I do love the crunch. I’ve been known to add some radishes, but just some fresh romaine lettuce, dressing, topped with a little bit more black pepper and grated cheese, and I’m in heaven!

caesar dressing
Simple Caesar Dressing

This recipe originally appeared in the April 2015 issue of Cooking Light.

2 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 Tablespoons grated parmesan cheese
1 ½ teaspoons fish sauce
½ teaspoon Dijon mustard
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
1 crushed garlic clove
1 large pasteurized egg yolk

1. Combine the ingredients in a mini food processor; pulse until combined.

2. With the processor running, slowly pour 3 Tablespoons canola oil, 2 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, and 2 Tablespoons water into egg yolk mixture. Process until just blended and smooth.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Inedible Food Jewelry!

pancakesAren’t these the cutest earrings ever? I friend pointed me in the direction of an Etsy site, where you can buy earrings and necklaces with all things food! Doughnuts, pizza, cookies, pies, pickles, olives, fruits and veggies, it’s all here! Even an everything bagel and a Chicago hot dog! It will take me forever to choose, they are all wonderful!

You can check all the offerings by clicking here.

Roasted Salmon with Dill, Capers, and Horseradish

Buying fish is so hard these days; you’re bombarded with talk in the news of mercury, farm raised versus wild, frozen versus fresh, I usually leave the fish counter confused and not buying anything. But sometimes I get a craving for salmon. I love it and it’s good for you, lots of Omega 3s. So I’ll throw out all the talk and get a nice piece of fish for dinner.

If you are looking for something to make for a special springtime meal, this is it. ­And it’s perfect for a dinner party, because you do all the prep the day before—or in my case, the morning before. Dinner was going to be late, so I prepped the salmon while my coffee was brewing thus it had a solid ten-plus hours in the fridge. The homemade crème fraîche was easy to mix up the night before, add the dill in the morning, and refrigerate all day.

I think I’ve seen fresh horseradish in the produce section, but I decided to cheat and use jarred horseradish sauce that was minimally processed. And my piece of salmon was just over a pound and I made it for two, so I have sauce left over for another meal. I served this for Easter dinner with last week’s springtime salad and potato salad. Delicious!

salmon
Roasted Salmon with Dill, Capers, and Horseradish
This recipe originally appeared in the April 2015 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

We couldn’t get over how delicious and silky-rich this salmon is, or how foolproof the recipe is. Don’t be thrown off by the total time it requires: Think of it instead as a great make-ahead dish, where all you have to do the night of the gathering is pop the fish in the oven for a short time. What you’re doing in step 1 is making homemade crème fraîche. It’s easy to do; it just takes some time. We love the creamy texture and luscious tang of homemade, but you can substitute purchased crème fraîche or full-fat sour cream. Look for a 3-pound side of salmon with even thickness. Avoid the thin tail end and buy two thicker (1 1/2-pound) pieces if you need to. The dill sauce will keep in the fridge for up to one week.

Yield: Serves 8 (serving size: about 4 ounces salmon and about 2 teaspoons sauce)

1/4 cup heavy whipping cream
1 1/2 teaspoons buttermilk
1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
1 1/8 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
1 1/8 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper, divided
1/4 cup finely grated fresh horseradish
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots
3 tablespoons capers, drained and chopped
3 tablespoons olive oil 1 (3-pound) salmon fillet

1. Combine cream, buttermilk, and vinegar in a small bowl. Cover with plastic wrap, and let stand at room temperature for 8 hours. Stir in dill, 1/8 teaspoon salt, and 1/8 teaspoon pepper. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

2. Meanwhile, combine remaining 1 teaspoon salt, remaining 1 teaspoon pepper, horseradish, and next 4 ingredients (through oil) in a small bowl. Spread horseradish mixture evenly over salmon. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

3. Preheat oven to 450°.

4. Place fish, skin side down, on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Bake at 450° for 13 minutes. Remove from oven.

5. Preheat broiler to high.

6. Broil fish 5 minutes or until desired degree of doneness. Cut fish into 8 equal portions; top fish with dill sauce.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Speaking of Salmon…

salmon nytCookbook author and New York Times contributor, Melissa Clark, is one of my favorite food writers. Her two cookbooks, Cook This Now and In the Kitchen with a Good Appetite are fantastic if you’re ever in need of a new cookbook. Similar to Mark Bittman, she can make a simple dish seem elegant. I came across this video for Salmon with Anchovy Butter the other day. It looks so good! Another salmon recipe to try!  

Fish in Coconut Curry

I tend to be a creature of habit (and those who know me well won’t be surprised by this admission). Almost every Saturday, I go to my spin class, buzz home for breakfast and a shower, go to the post office and library, and then out to lunch and grocery shopping. And since I tend to have more time on Saturday nights to cook dinner, I like to buy something special. This usually tends to be fish since it is fresh and follows my rule of buying and cooking fish on the same day. So I am always looking for new and delicious fish recipes.

And this recipe doesn’t disappoint! Originally appearing in the April 2014 issue of Cooking Light (it also appears in the cookbook Global Kitchen), this warm fish dish is flavorful and relatively easy to make even for the less advanced cook. Just a little bit of chopping, toss everything together, and dinner is ready! I love Asian, Indian, and Thai foods, so with the curry powder and coconut milk, it was a perfect combination of all three. I served it with coconut rice; for my version I cook brown rice and add a little bit of coconut milk to the water and shredded coconut if I have it on hand. Grated ginger is also a good addition.

A few of my changes; since halibut wasn’t available, I used cod in replacement. Instead of light coconut milk, I used ½ cup whole and ¼ cup of water. I forgot the cilantro, but I think it would be a great addition. For vegetarians, I think you could substitute chickpeas or tofu for the fish. My only quibble was no zing! I love all things spicy, so I added some crushed red pepper to my serving, but next time I’ll add some jalapeno with the red pepper to spice it up!

fishstewpic

Fish in Coconut Curry (Mtuzi wa Samaki)
This recipe originally appeared in the April 2014 issue of Cooking Light magazine.  

Tanzania sits at a crossroads in the spice trade routes from India. That’s why Indian spices ended up in so many Tanzanian dishes like this fish curry. The dish originated in Zanzibar but is now enjoyed all over the eastern coast of Africa. Coconut milk enriches the curry and gives it a tropical flavor. Serve over boiled yuca, potatoes, or rice.

Yield: Serves 4 (serving size: 1/2 cup sauce, 5 ounces fish, and 1 lemon wedge)
Hands-on: 20 Minutes
Total: 47 Minutes

Ingredients
1 (1 1/4-pound) skinless halibut or other firm white fish fillet
1 1/2 teaspoons Madras curry powder, divided
3/4 teaspoon salt, divided
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 cup finely chopped onion
1 cup finely chopped red bell pepper
2 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger
3 garlic cloves, minced
2 3/4 cups chopped tomato (2 large)
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
3/4 cup light coconut milk
4 lemon wedges
Chopped fresh cilantro (optional)

1. Sprinkle fish with 3/4 teaspoon curry powder, 3/8 teaspoon salt, and 1/8 teaspoon black pepper.

2. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add fish; cook 4 minutes or until deeply browned on bottom but undercooked on top (fish will finish cooking later in sauce). Remove fish from pan.

3. Add onion and bell pepper to pan; sauté 4 minutes or until tender. Add ginger and garlic; sauté 1 minute. Add remaining 3/4 teaspoon curry powder, remaining 3/8 teaspoon salt, remaining 1/8 teaspoon black pepper, tomato, and lemon juice. Reduce heat to medium-low, and cook 10 minutes or until tomato breaks down, stirring occasionally. Mash tomato with a wooden spoon.

4. Stir in coconut milk. Return fish along with accumulated juices to pan, browned side up. Reduce heat to low; cover and cook 8 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork. Cut fish into 4 equal portions. Spoon sauce into individual, shallow bowls; top each with a piece of fish. Serve with lemon wedges and chopped fresh cilantro, if desired.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week
416guNJMdHLI thought I was the only one in the world obsessed with Laurie Colwin and her food writing, but it turns out there is a whole new generation that is discovering her. A former essayist for Gourmet magazine, Colwin died at the young age of 48 of a heart attack. Her two books, Home Cooking and More Home Cooking sit on my writing desk as inspiration more than anything; reading her writing is like sitting down with a friend, it’s effortless. Last week’s Dining section of the New York Times included a wonderful story on Colwin and her new young followers. Here is a link to the article, I hope you enjoy!

White Fish with Tomatoes, Olives, and Basil

When the calendar turns to April, I don’t walk, I run to lighter dinners. Gone are the days of heavy-laden stews, soups, and meats; in comes fare that is light but still satisfies the soul, and also helps the middle waist that has grown a little in the past few months. My palate is weary and tired from yet another side dish of roasted vegetables, give me dinners that zing with just-picked freshness!

I’ve discovered my supermarket has frozen wild caught cod for a minimal price that is divided into small portions. Last week, I thawed a couple of pieces out for dinner, but yawned at the idea of yet another piece of baked fish for supper. A quick stop at the supermarket following my after-work walk led me to develop a Mediterranean-flavored dish that was easy to prepare as well as a light and healthy dish. Aside from the cost of the fish, it’s also relatively inexpensive as well. I like meals that are light on your pocketbook as well as your waistline!

This recipe can go in many directions; if you don’t like to cook with alcohol, you can leave out the wine. If you aren’t one for spicy foods, you can leave out the crushed red pepper. If you are looking to save a few calories, leave out the butter. But the main ingredients of tomatoes, olives, and fresh basil are important to keep, as well as using a light, white fish. By adding the fish to the warm sauce, you are poaching it, resulting in a light and flaky dish. Of course, if you have a thicker piece of fish, you may need to cook it just a little bit longer, until it is soft inside.


White Fish with Tomatoes, Olives, and Basil
If you have any sauce leftover, you can make a second meal by adding it to some pasta!

2 teaspoons of extra virgin olive oil
2 cloves of garlic, minced
1 large shallot, minced (or a couple of tablespoons minced red onion)
1 can diced tomatoes with juice
¼ cup chopped olives, Kalamata, green, or a mix
A couple splashes of white wine (about ¼ cup), optional
¼ cup or so, chopped fresh basil
A dash or two of crushed red pepper, optional
A couple teaspoons of butter to finish, optional
3-4 pieces of white fish–cod, sole, haddock

Heat the olive oil in a large skillet. When warm, add the garlic and shallots, cook over medium heat until soft. Raise the heat and add the tomatoes, olives, and wine, if using, and bring it to a soft boil. Cook until sauce is reduced a little but still thin. Add crushed red pepper, if using, and add basil, stirring to wilt. Tuck the fish into the sauce, covering it. Turn heat to medium and cook until fish is soft and flaky. Add butter, if using, to finish the sauce. To a plate, add a piece of fish and top it with a little bit of sauce. Serve with a simple salad or with some fresh roasted asparagus.

Yummy Fish Toppings

Since I don't have any food photos today, I thought I'd share this picture of my crabapple tree. Purchased 13 years ago for $5, it was a leftover from our library plant sale. A tiny thing when planted, look at her now!

I usually go grocery shopping on Saturday, which tends to mean fish for dinner. Since looking into the fish case these days is mind-boggling (Which fish shouldn’t I be eating? What is swai? Char?), I tend to stick with what I know: cod, haddock, and wild-caught salmon. Here are two sauces to top white fish and salmon that are both delicious and super easy!

Spicy Fish Sauce (for white fish)
Sorry, no measurements here, I just place everything in a small bowl, approximate, and taste along the way. If you have a pound of fish, about a 1/4 cup of sauce will be plenty. Topping with panko crumbs is a nice contrast, making the creamy fish crunchy.

Mayonnaise
Sour cream
Dijon mustard (optional, I frequently leave this out [or forget] and it’s still tasty!)
Horseradish
Lemon juice
Panko crumbs (optional)

In a small bowl, mix all the ingredients together. Lightly sprinkle the fish with cayenne pepper, if desired. (Cook’s note: I once saw the famous chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten  explain that he always preps white fish with a dash of cayenne and I’ve been doing it ever since. Just a tiny bit, as cayenne is extremely potent!) Cover the fish with the sauce and top with panko crumbs, if using. Bake at 350 degrees until fish is flaky, about 15-20 minutes or so, depending on your oven.

Maple Balsamic Marinade (for salmon)
You won’t believe it, but this recipe is based on one from those little cards you find near the fish monger at the grocery store! Years ago, a friend made it for me, gave me the recipe, and I’ve been making it ever since!

1/4 Cup orange juice
1/4 Cup maple syrup
3 Tablespoons balsamic vinegar
2 cloves of garlic, minced

Place all ingredients into a saucepan and bring to a boil. Cook for 5 minutes or so, or until sauce becomes slightly thick. Place the fish in a pan lined with aluminum foil, top with the sauce, and partially cover. Bake at 350 degrees until flaky, 20-25 minutes or so. If you’re grilling, brush the fish periodically until it is finished cooking.