Grilled Salmon with White Beans and Arugula Salad Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

I don’t have much to say about this recipe except it is absolutely perfect for this time of year! Salmon almost begs to be grilled and with a quick side salad, it’s fancy enough to serve to guests and is a superfast meal you can make in 20 minutes!

Since you already have some greens, you could serve some warmed bread as a side or some freshly sliced tomatoes with some torn fresh basil and a dribble of olive oil and your favorite vinegar. Dessert can be some fresh berries with cream.

Can you tell I love cooking and eating this time of year? 🙂

salmon

Grilled Salmon with White Beans and Arugula Salad
This recipe first appeared in the June 2016 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

1 tablespoon chopped capers, rinsed and drained
1/4 teaspoon grated lemon rind
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons olive oil
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
1/2 teaspoon minced fresh garlic
1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper
1 (15-ounce) can unsalted Great Northern beans, rinsed and drained
Cooking spray
4 (6-ounce) salmon fillets
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 cups loosely packed arugula
1/2 cup thinly sliced red onion

1. Whisk together capers, rind, juice, oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, garlic, and red pepper in a bowl.

2. Place beans in a bowl; drizzle with 2 tablespoons caper mixture.

3. Heat a grill pan over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Coat salmon with cooking spray; sprinkle with remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and black pepper. Add salmon to pan, skin side down; cook 6 minutes. Turn salmon over; cook 1 minute or until done. Keep warm.

4. Add arugula and onion to bowl with beans. Drizzle with remaining caper mixture; toss. Divide salad among 4 plates; top each serving with 1 fillet. Serve immediately.

peaches

(Photo by Andar Sawyers for the New York Times)

MVK’s *Like* of the Week: When is Peach Season?
I read this recent article in the New York Times with interest. Peaches are one of my favorite summertime fruits, along with red raspberries and local strawberries, but often I find they are either mealy or just never ripen. A good peach is hard to find! The article discusses the fruit’s season with experts and clears up the mystery a little bit. (Psst, for those of us in the Northeast, buy and eat them after July 4th!)

 

Warm Roasted Peaches and Cream

Apologies in advance to anyone who received the unwritten sneak peek at this story on Sunday. I’ve learned a valuable lesson, I’ve lost all capacity to multitask!

Each week I come home with lots of fruits and vegetables from the supermarket with the intention of cooking them up into delicious recipes, yet sometimes that doesn’t work out. An impulsive dinner out or a swifter dinner than planned because it’s late can change any evening. But instead of tossing out these limp and sad-looking orbs, I extend their life by roasting!

I know more than once I’ve extolled the virtues of roasting fruits and vegetables. If there is anything that looks like it has one foot in the compost pile, I cut it up, pop it in a pan with some olive oil, and roast. And the best thing about roasting is you can leave it in the oven and not worry how long to cook; sometimes the longer it cooks, the better it is!

Last fall I brought your roasted fall fruit—and we’re now getting into pear and apple season! This year, I wanted to extend summer a little bit further into September. One night when I was doing dishes, I noticed a bowl filled with peaches I had bought to make a pie but never got around to making. They were starting to turn and I either need to eat them or toss them; with the Eater of the House out of town, there was no way I was going to have my favorite pie on the counter—I’d be a full-sized kitchen when he returned home! But roasting them topped with a few drops of cream, that I could do.

After removing the skins, I added them to a oven-proof baking pan with a little bit of butter, a dash of sugar and nutmeg, and roasted them at 325 degrees for about 45 minutes. Once they start roasting, the juices come out, so just a little bit of the butter and sugar will go a long way–or use none at all if you prefer. Spooned into a bowl and with just a little bit of cream, I found it a very comforting and homey dessert.

The thermometer said it was in the 80s inside and I was a fool to turn on the oven, but for that evening, I was glad to extend the summertime heat for at least one more time.

peaches

Warm Roasted Peaches and Cream
Peaches, remove the skin with a paring knife
Butter, a couple of teaspoons
A sprinkle of sugar, white or brown, about 1 teaspoon
A few dashes of nutmeg and/or cinnamon
Cream for topping, optional

1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.

2. Add the sliced peaches to a pan and top with butter and nutmeg. Roast until the peaches are soft. When still warm, serve in a small dish with just a few drops of cream.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Try Something New!

watermelon radish
Do you know what this is?

I didn’t either until the other day. It’s a watermelon radish, which is an heirloom Chinese Daikon radish! (You can read more about it here.) But purchasing this got me thinking. Every week I usually buy the same fruits and vegetables, but I love it when I find something new to try! So if you’re at the farmer’s market or the coop, pick up a new-to-you fruit or vegetable. Don’t worry how to cook or prepare; there are a million recipes for everything on the Internet. So this week, try something new and expand your horizons; you might just find a new favorite! (My next vegetable to try is celery root. Ever seen one? They’re kind of scary looking, but people swear it’s delicious!)

celeryroot

 

Number 200

200What began during a March blizzard in 2011 as a creative way to get my adventures in the kitchen out into the world has developed into a weekly ritual of cooking and writing. In three years’ time, you’ve come along with me to specialty food shops in Florida, our local agricultural fair, and the sites of New York; my birthday tribute to Julia Child (when the electricity went out); I Mad Men’d myself for cocktails and Caesar salad; I’ve passed along family recipes, recipes I’ve created, and of course those from Cooking Light.

Despite being a pretty good home cook, I know there always is room to grow and for improvement. I recently made pancakes for my nephew who dubbed them good and gobbled them up, but when I bit into them, I realized I had forgotten the sugar! Well, at least my audience was happy! Just like everything in life, I am always learning and all I can do is to keep trying and mastering my craft. A big thank you to all who have been with me along the way, and a special thank you to Marta T., my very first follower who wasn’t related to me! And I can’t let this post escape with without thanking the Eater of the House, who has withstood experimental, delicious (and not so delicious), and really late dinners because of my writing and cooking! He is my first test taster, so nothing goes here without his seal of approval!

So since this is Post #200, I decided to give myself a reprieve this week and revisit my favorite pie recipe since it’s August and peach season. What better way to celebrate these beautiful golden orbs than with a pie?

peach pie

I can’t take credit for this pie; my Mom baked this beauty!


Crumbly Peach Pie
2/3 cup sugar (scant)
3/8 cup (6 Tablespoons) flour
1/3 cup (5 Tablespoons) butter (scant)
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg 6-8 peach halves, skinned

Mix the ingredients together and place half of the mixture at the bottom of a ready-to-bake pie crust. Place the peach halves on top and add the remainder of the crumbly mixture. Bake at 400 degrees for 10 minutes, then 325 degrees for 30 minutes or until golden.

To peel peaches: Fill a large pan with water and bring to a boil. In the sink, fill a large bowl with extra cold water. When the water has come to a boil, add the peaches one at a time and let it sit in the water for about 45 seconds to a minute. (The timing is very important, as you don’t want the peaches to cook.) Transfer immediately to the bowl of cold water. If everything goes well, you should be able to slip off the skins easily with your fingers. If you find they don’t, you can stick them in the hot water a little bit longer.

MVK’s Endorsement of the Week: Tourterelle, New Haven, Vermont
For my 200th post, I thought I would give you a little peek at food in other kitchens in the state. Tourterelle is one of my favorite local restaurants that is one where we go for special occasions. The Eater of the House took me out a couple of weeks ago as a thank you for the pick up and drop off during a hiking excursion. French in theme, it’s a little country house that has a beautiful bar and several rooms where you can dine solo, à deux, or with a party.

I wasn’t very hungry that night, but that didn’t stop us from ordering the Salade de Homard (lobster salad), chunks of lobster with crunchy kohlrabi, radishes, a thin buttermilk dressing, and topped with puffed polenta. I could have eaten three of those alone! For my entrée, I ordered the Crêpe à la St Jacques, a thinly folded crepe with fresh sea scallops and wild mushrooms in a thin wine sauce. (If I were at home, I would have licked my plate!)

Unless it’s going to our local pub, I like to go to restaurants that serve food I can’t or won’t make at home. I know I will never even attempt to make crêpes at home, so this was a lovely evening out with absolutely delicious food. So this week, let someone else do the cooking and tell me about your adventures!
lobstercrepe

Crumbly Peach Pie

It’s almost the middle of July and the refrigerator already is bursting at its seams with fruit! Cherries, blueberries, cantaloupe, peaches, bananas, raspberries, lemons, limes, grapes, and watermelon are filling the shelves, leaving precious little room for anything else. Fresh fruit for breakfast, for lunch, and in the evening, we live for this season in the dead of January.

Last week we were out of town for three days, but before I left I put a bowl of almost ripe peaches in the fridge so they wouldn’t go bad before my return. When I pulled the five peaches out, they were ready to go, but I wasn’t. I had no desire to eat them plain and had to figure out how I wanted to use them. There is only one recipe that will make me turn on the stove in 80 degree weather: my grandmother’s recipe for Crumbly Peach Pie!

I grew up eating this pie at the height of peach season every the summer and have carried on the tradition, making it at least once every summer. While the recipe came from my grandmother, who passed it on to my mother, who passed it on to me (with various changes along the way), I always thought it was a family recipe. Imagine my surprise when I was going through Grandma’s old recipe books to find a version of this in an old Betty Crocker cookbook! No matter, this pie with its flaky, crumbly filling, just ripe peaches, and homemade crust is delicious, decadent, and easy. Good for breakfast, lunch, snack, and dessert! I think serving it at room temperature is best.

Crumbly Peach Pie
Cook’s note: This is directly from Grandma’s recipe, but since I am horrible at math, I put in the tablespoon conversion of what I use. 

2/3 cup sugar (scant)
3/8 cup (6 Tablespoons) flour
1/3 cup (5 Tablespoons) butter (scant)
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
6-8 peach halves, skinned

Mix the ingredients together and place half of the mixture at the bottom of a ready-to-bake pie crust. Place the peach halves on top and add the remainder of the crumbly mixture. Bake at 400 degrees for 10 minutes, then 325 degrees for 30 minutes or until golden.

To peel peaches: This is the easiest method I’ve found, albeit a bit tedious. Fill a large pan with water and bring to a boil. In the sink, fill a large bowl with extra cold water. When the water has come to a boil, add the peaches one at a time and let it sit in the water for about 45 seconds to a minute. (The timing is very important, as you don’t want the peaches to cook.) Transfer immediately to the bowl of cold water. If everything goes well, you should be able to peel the skins off easily with your fingers. If you find they don’t, you can stick them in the hot water a little bit longer.