Just in Time for the Holiday Weekend: Spiedies!

field

You know it’s late August when goldenrod blankets the front meadow!

 

What pray tell are spiedies you ask? (Pronounced “speedies.”) They are the best marinated meat you are ever going to make!

I have lived my entire life eating spiedies at least one each summer and usually more. Originating with Italian immigrants, it is a flavorful marinade made for chicken, pork, and (the traditional) lamb kabobs that you place on skewers, grill, and then wrap squishy Italian bread around them. They are a popular sandwich in Binghamton, New York, and its surrounding areas, where my family is from, and originated with the Italian immigrants in the areas. A trip always means someone is going to go out and get some spiedies to eat—and sometimes more than once!

You can buy spiedie sauce on the market (Salamida’s is the best) which works in a pinch, but there is something when there is fresh garlic and mint from the garden that makes me want to whip up a batch. I based my recipe on one that I found years ago by Patrick Kennedy, the winner of the Spiedie Fest cook off in Endicott, New York (my birthplace) one year. After many attempts, I tweaked it so it is the way I like it. Marinade the meat for up to three days, so if you’re going away this weekend, make a batch before you go so you can have your own spiedie fest on Labor Day!

spiedies

I couldn’t decide, so I recently made chicken and pork spiedies!

Spiedie Sauce
While it’s sacrilegious, I love to serve it on top of greens for a flavorful salad!

¾ cup oil (safflower, canola, or another neutral flavored oil)
1 ¼ cups cider vinegar
½ Tablespoon dried thyme
½ Tablespoon dried oregano
1 Tablespoon garlic powder
2 Tablespoons (or more) fresh, chopped mint
The juice from one whole lemon
¼ cup finely chopped fresh garlic

Mix all the ingredients in bowl and add to a heavy plastic bag. Add your chopped meat and marinade for up to three days (I find two days is perfect.). Grill until done and wrap a piece of Italian bread around it and enjoy!

proteinMVK’s Like of the Week: Meatless High Protein Foods
While I love meat (as evidenced above), I do eat vegetarian most of the week. And with that, I’m always looking to vegetarian sources to get my protein. While the list is not vegan, it does give you ten great non-meat ideas for breakfast, lunch, and dinner! You can check out the list here.

Grilled Salmon with White Beans and Arugula Salad Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

I don’t have much to say about this recipe except it is absolutely perfect for this time of year! Salmon almost begs to be grilled and with a quick side salad, it’s fancy enough to serve to guests and is a superfast meal you can make in 20 minutes!

Since you already have some greens, you could serve some warmed bread as a side or some freshly sliced tomatoes with some torn fresh basil and a dribble of olive oil and your favorite vinegar. Dessert can be some fresh berries with cream.

Can you tell I love cooking and eating this time of year? 🙂

salmon

Grilled Salmon with White Beans and Arugula Salad
This recipe first appeared in the June 2016 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

1 tablespoon chopped capers, rinsed and drained
1/4 teaspoon grated lemon rind
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons olive oil
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
1/2 teaspoon minced fresh garlic
1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper
1 (15-ounce) can unsalted Great Northern beans, rinsed and drained
Cooking spray
4 (6-ounce) salmon fillets
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 cups loosely packed arugula
1/2 cup thinly sliced red onion

1. Whisk together capers, rind, juice, oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, garlic, and red pepper in a bowl.

2. Place beans in a bowl; drizzle with 2 tablespoons caper mixture.

3. Heat a grill pan over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Coat salmon with cooking spray; sprinkle with remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and black pepper. Add salmon to pan, skin side down; cook 6 minutes. Turn salmon over; cook 1 minute or until done. Keep warm.

4. Add arugula and onion to bowl with beans. Drizzle with remaining caper mixture; toss. Divide salad among 4 plates; top each serving with 1 fillet. Serve immediately.

peaches

(Photo by Andar Sawyers for the New York Times)

MVK’s *Like* of the Week: When is Peach Season?
I read this recent article in the New York Times with interest. Peaches are one of my favorite summertime fruits, along with red raspberries and local strawberries, but often I find they are either mealy or just never ripen. A good peach is hard to find! The article discusses the fruit’s season with experts and clears up the mystery a little bit. (Psst, for those of us in the Northeast, buy and eat them after July 4th!)

 

Grilled Corn Salad Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

sunrise
This is one of my most favorite times of the year. I come home from the farmer’s market with my bags overflowing with greens, squashes, cucumbers, herbs, and onions. Fresh peaches and berries are finally available, too. Dinners are made up of lots of vegetable dishes, trying different recipes and ways to bring new life to an old favorite. Soon it will be corn season and this year I have a delicious recipe for you to try.

A couple of years back, I saw a recipe that called for adding a spritz of fresh lime juice and some chopped cilantro along with the usual butter to an ear of corn. I love fresh corn, but to be honest, it’s not the easiest thing in the world to eat, and plus it gets caught in my teeth. But I love it and will never stop eating it. When I picked up a couple of ears at the store, I recently thought about taking that recipe, changing it up a little bit, and turning it into a salad! And instead of boiling the corn, roasting it on the grill.

This is another one of my recipes that has no measurements, just fix it to your own palate. I like this dish when it is barely warm; the butter and lime juice melded with the cilantro gives a little sweet sour flavor. If you don’t have fresh corn, you can skip the grilling step and warm the corn on the stove and make the salad that way, but roasting the corn gives it an earthy taste that is to die for.

And you can get in the driver’s seat and use this as a base for a grain or bean salad, or add some grilled diced zucchini or summer squash. Peas? Yup, those would be good too. Meat lovers, this goes great with steak, pork, and chicken. if you are a cilantro hater, you could substitute fresh basil. While this has a couple more steps than just boiling some corn, I think it is worth the extra effort!

corn sal2Grilled Corn Salad

Corn, shucked and all silk removed
Butter (vegans, this can be omitted)
Fresh lime juice
Chopped cilantro, a couple of tablespoons
Chopped fresh scallions, if desired
Salt and pepper

1. Heat a large pot of water on the stove and bring to a boil. Add the ears of corn and boil for just three minutes. Remove and set aside.

2. While the water is getting ready to boil, prepare the grill. When the corn is finished bar boiling, put the corn on a oiled grill and continue to turn the corn cobs over until slightly charred (about ten minutes or so).

3. When the corn is cool to the touch, take a large mixing bowl, stand the corn cob up vertical with the flat side on the bottom. With a sharp knife, cut the corn from the cob. In the bowl, add the butter, lime juice, cilantro, and scallions, if using, salt and pepper. Serve just slightly warm.

 

corn cobsMVK’s *Like* of the Week: Don’t Throw Away the Corn Cobs! Funnily enough, as I’m working on this recipe, I spotted this story on what to do with used corn cobs! Mine ended up in the compost pile to be a meal for a lucky raccoon or deer, but these are great suggestions for future recipes!

Summertime Holiday Dishes Plus MVK’s Food News of the Week

Note, apologies for the advance unedited piece you may have received on Monday; I’ve been having some troubles with my host and it sent instead of saved!  

I wish every morning this could be my view at breakfast.

I wish this could be my view at breakfast every morning! My view from the top of Mount Abraham.

“In the summertime when the weather is hot
You can stretch right up and touch the sky.”

“In the Summertime,” by Jerry Mungo

The first two lines of this old chestnut have been an earworm for the past two weeks or so. Long sunny days with the light going well past nine, and starting around 4:30 a.m., have me out and about well before my usual early rising time and sometimes well past my bedtime. No matter, this time is fleeting and I know in just a few short weeks I’ll start to notice the time change and that it’s no longer a bright light that wakens me.

That said, it’s almost Fourth of July weekend, which for some marks the start of summer. This is one of those golden years where the holiday is bumped with a weekend, so we don’t have the odd middle-of-the-week day off. I always find this time of year as one with family and friend gatherings, summer guests, picnics, and lots of opportunity to feed a crowd. So this week I’m recycling a favorite idea and bringing you some past suggestions for summer eating and hosting!

index

Miscellaneous and Appetizers

Jordan Marsh’s Blueberry Muffins
If you have some fresh blueberries, these are delicious and easy.

Meditteranean Kebobs
My go-to dish for potlucks.

Black Bean Hummus with Queso Fresco
I took this once to a dinner party and I ended up eating most of it! It’s SO good!

Kale Chips
Healthier than potato chips!

Soups and Main Dishes

Julia Child’s Vichyssoise
I’m not one for summer soups, but I do love this one.

Summer Minestrone Soup
A great soup with summertime vegetables.

Zucchini and Red Pepper Frittata
Eggs are a real lifesaver for dinner on summer evenings.

Marinated Grilled Chicken Legs
These are great hot off the grill or cold.

Marinated London Broil
Mmm…

Salads

Israeli Couscous “Tabbouleh”
A fun spin on an old favorite.

MVK’s Nicoise Salad
My take on this classic French summer meal.

Szechuan Cucumbers
No guilt if you eat the whole bowl!

Red White and Blue Salad
A fun salad for the holiday!

Asian Green Bean Salad 
A great vegetarian dish with an Asian twist.

Cavatappi Salad with Tuna and Olives
A delicious heart-healthy pasta salad.

Desserts

Strawberry Shortcake
It’s not summer without having this for dinner one night.

Old Fashioned Blueberry-Maple Pie
A Vermont spin on an old fashioned favorite.

pepsiMVK’s Food News of the Week: This is How Much Celebrities are Paid to Endorse Unhealthy Foods
I recently read this article about how much celebrities are paid to endorse certain foods, mainly soda and fast food. I was surprised and also saddened. If you can believe it (I can’t), Beyoncé was paid $50 million (yes, you read correctly) to promote Pepsi products! You can read the article by clicking here.

Spicy Black Bean and Corn Salad Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

It was a picture perfect morning for an early kayak ride!

It was a beautiful morning for an early kayak ride!

‘Tis the season of temperatures in the 80s and the sunset being around 8:30 p.m. Which means I want to take advantage of every second I can when I get out of work to be outdoors. And which also means dinners are late. Very late. While exercising, I create recipes in my head with items I have in the fridge and the cupboards so I can make a quick meal because I’ll be famished when I walk in the door. (This is how I get through a hike–thinking of food!) This salad is one such creation; I wanted something healthy, of course tasty, but one that I call a “dump it” salad, throw everything in a big bowl, toss and serve.

I’m a big advocate for canned beans, especially this time of year. Even though I prefer to cook my own dried beans, it’s definitely less expensive but more time-consuming, I find I don’t spend as much time in the kitchen as I do in the winter; having a few cans on hand for quick meals like this are a life saver. I measured out two cups of frozen corn to defrost for a couple of hours. When I got home, I took my big mixing bowl and started to add what I had in the fridge and cupboard. I didn’t have enough lime for a quarter cup, so I added some lemon juice. If you don’t have both herbs, you can use just one. And of course, there are substitutes galore: red pepper in place of the tomatoes, scallions in place of the red onion, cucumber in place of zucchini. Or add some protein; I was thinking cooked chicken or grilled shrimp would be good, or even some quinoa or another grain. I served it with grilled chicken sausages and it was fantastic. And of course, if your palate isn’t one for spicy foods, omit the cayenne entirely; just a tiny bit goes a really long way!

This dish makes close to four cups, which I thought was plenty enough for dinner for two and at least lunch the next day. Until I heard the Eater of the House, who went for seconds (or was it thirds?) ask if he could have the rest of the salad! “I wouldn’t eat so much if your food wasn’t so good!” I guess that’s a rousing endorsement for this recipe!

black bean sal 

Spicy Black Bean and Corn Salad
This recipe can easily be doubled for a summertime potluck!

2 cups, defrosted corn
1 can black beans, rinsed
1 cup grape tomatoes, halved
2 Tablespoon diced red onion or shallots
1 small zucchini, diced
Chopped fresh basil and cilantro (2 Tablespoons each)
½ avocado, diced
¼ cup fresh lime juice or lime and lemon juice
A dash of cayenne or a bit of chopped jalapeno (optional)
Salt and pepper to taste

In advance of cooking, defrost the corn until thawed (at least two hours). Add to large mixing bowl, and add the remaining ingredients (through lime juice). Add cayenne, if using, and salt and pepper.

coloring bookkMVK’s *Like* of the Week: A Coloring Book for People Who Like Food
The biggest things these days in bookshops aren’t the books themselves, it is coloring books for adults! While I myself haven’t gotten into this craze (I like to read too much to spend time coloring), this one did spark my interest, a book for people who like food! Edible Paradise is just that, pictures of lots of fruits and vegetables that you color! I don’t know if this will make me put my book down and pick up a coloring pencil or pen, but it might! You can read more about it here.

BBQ Pork Tenderloin with Bell Pepper Relish Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

 

I've been hiking this same path for the past few months and love looking at the changes in the scenery. Each time it's different and it's getting greener and greener!

I’ve been hiking this same path for the past few months and love seeing the changes in the scenery. Each time it’s different and it’s getting greener and greener!

And just like that, it was summer.

After a warmer than normal winter and what I thought to be a colder and wetter than normal spring, it seems like overnight we are in summer and the thick of heat and humidity. Which means I close my kitchen and meals are salads, grilled, anything that doesn’t require turning on the oven and stove. And this recipe is perfect for that!

I made this recipe piecemeal. When it was cool in the morning, I made the barbecue sauce. As I was moving about in the house in the afternoon, I made the bell pepper relish, so everything was ready when it came time to grill. I decided to go with the less expensive center-cut pork chops, mostly because I wanted leftovers for my lunch. And I didn’t use the pre-chopped veggies, as I had the peppers and onion in the fridge.

This recipe was exactly what I wanted in a summer dinner. The spiciness of the sauce and the crisp, fresh flavor of the bell peppers was delicious and complemented each other with the pork. The bell pepper relish was SO good, I’m going to make it again to serve over other cuts of meat.

I made this on a weekend night, but time-wise it definitely could be made during the work week. And using the pork chops, I was able to have leftovers for a couple of lunches, too! Served with coleslaw, this was a delicious way to welcome in the new season!

pork and relishBBQ Pork Tenderloin with Bell Pepper Relish

This recipe first appeared in the June 2016 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

1/2 cup prechopped onion
1 (8-ounce) package prechopped red, yellow, and green bell pepper ( I diced up one yellow and one red pepper)
3/4 cup cider vinegar, divided
3/4 cup water, divided
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon plus 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
1/2 cup unsalted ketchup
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon dry mustard
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground red pepper
Cooking spray
1 (1-pound) pork tenderloin, trimmed
1. Preheat grill to medium-high heat.

2. Combine onion and bell pepper in a bowl. Bring 1/2 cup vinegar, 1/2 cup water, sugar, and 1 tablespoon salt to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Pour vinegar mixture over bell pepper mixture; let stand 15 minutes. Drain.

3. Bring remaining 1/4 cup vinegar, remaining 1/4 cup water, 1/4 teaspoon salt, ketchup, and next 6 ingredients (through red pepper) to a boil in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Cook 4 minutes or until slightly thickened, stirring occasionally. Place 1/2 cup sauce in a small bowl; reserve.

4. Coat grill rack with cooking spray. Sprinkle pork with remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt. Add pork to grill; grill 10 minutes, turning occasionally. Brush pork with remaining sauce; grill 5 minutes or until a thermometer inserted in the center registers 140°. Place pork on a cutting board; let stand 5 minutes. Cut into 12 slices. Serve with bell pepper mixture and reserved 1/2 cup barbecue sauce.

MVK’s *Like* of the Week: Speaking of Grilling…

I’ll admit, I’m not the best griller in the world. But these tips, sent to me by a local business, are really helpful! I’m going to use these to make myself a better griller for the summer of 2016!

grilling

 

Roasted BBQ Drumsticks and Cowboy Beans Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

The leaves are finally beginning to turn!

The leaves are finally beginning to turn!

Before turning my cooking attention to warm stews, squashes, and gingerbready sorts of treats for fall, being it is the end of September, I thought I would bring you one last blast of summer this morning! Although, since this recipe is roasted in the oven, you could bring summer to the dinner table any time of the year!

Don’t be put off by the list of ingredients; it’s just some measuring, placing in a bowl, and giving a stir. The cowboy beans were so delicious and flavorful, just the right balance of sweet, spicy, and a little tangy. They’ll definitely make my meal rotation when I’m looking for something different to accompany chicken or pork or just on their own as a vegetarian meal with a salad. I used smoked paprika to give it a little extra kick of heat.

This is another one of those quick dinners you can easily make on a weeknight. If you have time in the morning, you can prep the onion and red pepper, and mix the ketchup mixture for the beans, so it’s all set to go when you’re ready to cook. I served this with the last of the summer’s corn on the cob and it was delicious. It was even better for lunch the next day!


cowboy chicken
Roasted BBQ Drumsticks with Cowboy Beans
This recipe first appeared in the September 2015 issue of Cooking Light magazine.

Yield: Serves 4 (serving size: 2 drumsticks and about 1/2 cup bean mixture)

8 skinless chicken drumsticks (about 2 pounds)
Cooking spray
2 tablespoons unsalted tomato paste
1 tablespoon lower-sodium soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped red bell pepper
1/4 cup unsalted ketchup
1 tablespoon brown sugar
2 tablespoons water
1 tablespoon molasses
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon paprika
1 (15-ounce) can unsalted pinto beans, rinsed and drained

1. Preheat oven to 450°.

2. Place drumsticks on a foil-lined baking sheet coated with cooking spray; bake at 450° for 20 minutes. Combine tomato paste, soy sauce, sugar, and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper in a bowl. Brush half of soy sauce mixture over chicken; bake at 450° for 10 minutes. Turn, brush with remaining soy sauce mixture, and bake at 450° for 5 minutes or until chicken is done.

3. Heat a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Add oil; swirl to coat. Add onion and bell pepper; sauté 6 minutes. Stir in remaining 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, ketchup, and next 6 ingredients (through paprika); bring to a boil. Cook 1 minute, stirring frequently. Add beans; cook 1 minute, stirring occasionally. Serve with drumsticks.

(Image: POPSUGAR Photography)

MVK’s *Like* of the Week: Want to Lose Weight? Keep These 10 Foods in Your Fridge
Even if you don’t need to lose weight or just want to eat more healthfully, I always find it a good reminder to read articles such as this one from Pop Sugar for a reality check. And it’s a good reminder when you’re writing your grocery list! Check it out!

Weeknight Dinner Series: Squash Ribbon Pasta with Herb Cream Sauce Plus Bye Bye Bittman

The sky this time of year can sometimes take your breath away. #nofilter

The sky this time of year can sometimes take your breath away. #nofilter

Despite loving to cook and spend time in the kitchen, I find I spend less and less time in the kitchen making dinner in the summer. To take advantage of the light as much as I can, after-work time is spent walking, mowing the lawn, reading, writing, everything but making dinner. Which means it gets on the table late, sometimes really late; our usual 8 p.m. dining time has been bumped sometimes to 8:30 and even close to 9 p.m.! With the start of September, I decided to make a new start and to start cooking earlier, which means I’m looking for quick, nutritious and healthy dishes to make on a weeknight.

You’re going to want to make this pasta dish NOW! It’s perfect for late summer, since zucchini, summer squash, and fresh herbs are still plenty. This recipe had three techniques I’d never used before: “wilting” the squash by pouring the hot pasta water on it, softening and tempering the onion flavor by boiling it with the pasta, and making a roux without butter. All worked beautifully and I definitely got this on the table in record time!

I prefer to buy small squashes, so I used two or three of each, because you can never go wrong adding more veggies. Since there is no butter in the sauce, I flavored it with a little bit of white wine, which was perfect. Lemon juice would be a good addition, too. I had some mushrooms in the veggie bin, so I sautéed a few in olive oil to add for a bit more texture to the sauce. Those who eat gluten-free, brown rice pasta can easily be substituted for the fettuccine.

Lots of vegetables, freshly chopped herbs, and one cooking pot for easy cleanup, this is a recipe that will please even those meat lovers in your house—and get on the table quickly. Cook it tonight!

Happy Eating!

squash pastaSquash Ribbon Pasta with Herb Cream Sauce

This recipe first appeared in the September 2015 issue of Cooking Light magazine. Serves 4 (serving size: about 1 1/2 cups)

1 medium zucchini (about 8 ounces)
1 medium summer squash (about 8 ounces)
8 ounces uncooked fettuccine
1/2 cup thinly sliced red onion
1 cup 2% reduced-fat milk
1 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/3 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup chopped fresh tarragon, basil, or parsley
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1. Shave squashes into thin strips using a vegetable peeler; place in a colander. Bring a large saucepan filled with water to a boil. Add pasta; cook 6 minutes. Add red onion; cook 2 minutes. Drain pasta mixture over squash in colander.

2. Return pan to medium-high heat. Add milk and flour; bring to a boil. Cook 1 minute or until slightly thickened, stirring constantly. Stir in cream; cook for 1 minute. Add pasta mixture, stirring to coat. Stir in the herbs, salt, and pepper. Serve immediately.

 

(JooHee Yoon/New York Times?

(JooHee Yoon/New York Times)

MVK’s *Like* of the Week: A Farewell
Or sadly, my dislike of the week. One of my all-time favorite food writers, Mark Bittman, is hanging his The New York Times pen to join a young start-up company. The original Minimalist, for years Bittman’s weekly column introduced readers to healthy eating with quick, easy-to-make recipes. Even years later, I still to this day refer to his tips on salads, grilling, summer cooking, holiday cooking, and more. His style of cooking is what I strive for every time I enter the kitchen, and he makes it look so easy! His opinion piece which began five years ago, educated cooks and readers to the politics of food and frequently made me think about where my food is coming from, and where, ethically, the food industry is going.

While my weekly dose of Bittman inspiration is a loss for me as cook and reader, his presence will still be in the limelight. His newest cookbook, Mark Bittman’s Kitchen Matrix: More Than 700 Simple Recipes and Techniques to Mix and Match for Endless Possibilities, comes out at the end of October. And I still have those dog-eared columns.

It’s Labor Day Weekend Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

This time of year, the front meadow is a sea of goldenrod.

This time of year, the front meadow is a sea of goldenrod.

I always use Labor Day weekend as the benchmark for the end of summer. Kids are back at school, the days are getting shorter and cooler, and the local apple orchard is now open. So this weekend is a perfect time to say goodbye to the season and to invite some friends over for some a delicious meal! I’ve scoured MVK’s archives for some recipes that would be perfect for this time of year. I hope whatever you do this coming weekend, it is filled with good food!

Appetizers

Deviled Eggs
Who doesn’t like deviled eggs? Take this to a party and they will be gone in the blink of an eye!

Baked Artichoke Dip
While this is a little fussy, it is well worth the effort.

Homemade Hummus
Know the ingredients in your hummus by making a batch of your own!

Mediterranean Kebabs
You don’t even need to know how to cook to make this tasty appetizer!

Entrees

Marinated Grilled Chicken Legs
Get the grill going for this flavorful chicken dish.

Linguine with Clam Sauce
If you can find fresh clams, this dish will be phenomenal, but canned work just as well.

Mystic Pizza
Impress your guests by grilling this pizza!

Marinated London Broil
Mmmmm…..

Brazilian Fish Stew
This stew tastes like a professional made it. Show off your skills!

Salads and Such

Potato Salad
I made this over Fourth of July weekend and am still thinking about it!

Kale Salad
Instead of a usual green salad try using kale instead!

Quick Pickles
Because I love these!

And you can never go wrong with a platter of sliced fresh tomatoes with basil and a little drizzle of olive oil and balsamic vinegar.

Desserts

Warm Roasted Peaches with Cream
Pick up some Amish peaches if you’re in the Northeast and roast them with a little cinnamon and nutmeg. You won’t be sorry!

Brownies
You’ll make a friend for life if you make a couple batches of these incredible brownies.

Crumbly Peach Pie
A summer isn’t complete without making my grandmother’s peach pie.

Cocktails

Mad Men Manhattan

Margaritas

Mocktails

sunday dinner

(Photo Steve Cavalier/Alamy/Alamy)

MVK’s *Like* of the Week: Should Sunday Roast Dinners Still be on the Menu?
One of the things I was most excited about when I was in London last year was going out for Sunday Roast, which is basically a full dinner at lunchtime. I have a version of that in my own home almost every Sunday because there is more time to cook; a really nice meal, usually a roast of some sort, to end the weekend and to have a nice start to the work week. Sunday just feels odd if I’m throwing together a stir fry.

So I really enjoyed this pro and con op-ed piece out of The Guardian last week for Sunday roast dinners.  Of course I’m in the “pro” camp; they truly are a comfort blanket meal. You can read the article in its entirety here.

The Lazy, Shorter Days of Summer: Late Season Pesto Plus MVK’s *Like* of the Week

Summertime and the living is easy!

Summertime, and the livin’ is easy!

Vermont in August is one of my favorite times of the year. While the light has quickly diminished in both the morning and evening, the fields are now a bright yellow with goldenrod, a little bit quieter, and the gardens have reached their peaks. While the days can still be quite warm, nighttime is usually perfectly cool sleeping weather. Weekends are spent at the lake, soaking in the sun and making memories that (hopefully) will keep us warm in the winter.

Speaking of gardens, you’ll never see me turn down an offer of free vegetables or fruit from someone’s garden. Which was the reason I was cutting up cups and cups of late season rhubarb for pies a couple of weeks ago, and why I found myself in a friend’s garden one recent evening, pulling all of the basil that she didn’t want. While it was almost past its time, it was still salvageable and all I could see was green, and knew I could make mounds and mounds of pesto.

I can grow tired very quickly if I eat the same thing all the time–leftovers are a two-meal minimum for me–but I think I could eat pesto every day and be completely happy! There is something about the mixture of basil, garlic, nuts, cheese, and olive oil that is heaven on a plate. During the summer I make it just about every Monday night for dinner. Even during my detox I talked about a few weeks ago, I created a dairy-free pesto that was almost as good as the real thing, served over quinoa pasta! For my friend who graciously gave me the basil, I made a nut-free and dairy free version for her.

The word pesto comes from the Italian, pestare, which means “to pound or crush,” and I have certainly made it many times the authentic way with a mortar and pestle, but my blender is a lot quicker when making lots. For nuts, I’ve used almonds, walnuts, or the traditional pine nuts. Or I’ve left them out if I don’t have any on hand. Making batches ahead of time will be a way to bring some summer into the darkness of the cold, winter months!

It's a pesto explosion in my kitchen!

It’s a pesto explosion in my kitchen!

Late Season Pesto

I don’t measure when I make this. Ever. So these are my approximations of measurements. I go by taste, so as you’re mixing, keep tasting to see if it suits your palate. When freezing, I put a little piece of plastic wrap on the top of the pesto to keep it from drying out.

1 large garlic clove
2 large handfuls of basil leaves
A few parsley stalks (preferably flat-leafed parsley), about 2-3 tablespoons
About 3 tablespoons grated parmesan or Asiago cheese
2 tablespoons whole almonds (or substitute walnuts or pine nuts)
Extra virgin olive oil, roughly ¼ cup (you can also use some hot water as a substitute for some of the oil)

With a blender, add the ingredients one at a time, ending with enough olive oil to make a paste. Serve over pasta, veggies, fish, or toasted bread.

movie posterMVK’s *Like of the Week: “That Sugar Film”
Are you like me and think the food you find in a health food store is good for you? Think again. Australian filmmaker, Damon Gameau, has a movie out, based on the movie “Super Size Me,” where he eats only “health foods,” but which are actually filled with added sugar. For two months, he gave up his normal diet of fresh foods for one that contains 40 teaspoons of sugar daily. But he wasn’t eating the obvious sugary foods like ice cream, candy, and soda. He instead focused on those foods perceived as healthy, but which contain added sugars: juices, low-fat yogurt, healthy bars, cereals. The effect of the diet is shocking.

While I think the movie is a bit gimmicky to get his point across, maybe this will be added to the American dialogue we are having about food and how it can help, or in this case hurt, your body. You can read more about the film and watch a trailer by clicking here.